Descendants of Randall Revell

By James R. Revell, Sr. -- GHOTE

Virginia Revells

This document represents a trace of the direct lineage of the Revell family in Virginia beginning in 1634 and continuing through time until approximately 1830. The purpose of this trace is to discover, explore and document all Revell sources from the first family immigrant to America. And in particular learn who are the parents of Randall C. Revell, my great, great grandfather who was born in Accomac County in 1813 and was buried in Portsmouth, Virginia in 1848.

The Virginia Revell’s history begins with Randall Revell (1613) and his first wife, Rebecca Nichols Revell and evolves through their son Edward Revell who remained in Virginia after his father relocated to Somerset County, Maryland. Randall served in the Maryland Assembly (1638/9) and 1641/2, the Virginia House of Burgesses (1657/8). He was selected as a Justice of the Peace for Accomack County while the county was in process of being separated from Northampton County (1660) and worked to bring about that transition. However, later in the year Randall got a better offer and the following year accepted the position of chief land commissioner for the Eastern Shore of the Province of Maryland and served in that capacity during the years 1661-2-3. During Randall's lifetime he also served Somerset County as High Sheriff of Somerset County during the years 1669-70 -71and Justice for the Peace Manokin/Annenmessex 1662 and 1663. Trade Commissioner for Maryland 1662

In 1660 the Maryland Eastern Shore generally included all of the land south of the Choptank River to the Virginia line. While this land was inhabited it remained mostly unsettled. The Commission consisted of three persons, all present residents of Northampton County and required "any two of them to remain within the province". The Commissioners were Edmund Scarburgh John Elzey and Randall. It was their job was to encourage settlers to relocate and populate this territory and thus protect this land from encroachment from Virginia. As the primary Officer of the Eastern Shore for Cecil, Lord Baltimore he and two other gentlemen set about to fulfill this mission. Randall gave all his Virginia properties to his son, Edward and relocated approximately 60 persons to the Manokin area that became later Somerset County. For this he and Ms. Ann Toft were awarded 3000 acres of land known as "Double Purchase" situated on what I known today as Revell's Neck. Later he added an additional 2850 acres of land called "Arrocco" to his holdings to form his manor. John Elzey also relocated to the Annemessex area in Maryland. Edmund Scarburgh remained in Virginia and history affords him a completely different role in the formation of Somerset County and the Virginia/Maryland state line.

The Maryland Revell’s are covered under a separate document that follows Randall and his second wife Katherine Scarburgh, sister of Col. Edmund Scarburgh, and daughter of Captain Edmund Scarburgh, from Virginia to Somerset County, Maryland.

Every caution has been taken to verify the accuracy of the data offered in this document. However, this remains a work in progress and the reader is cautioned that mistakes may have occurred. Further, this document concentrates in tracing the male heirs of the Revell family. However, where possible the first and second generation of inter-family marriages is also provided to help establish co-lateral lines and reveal other family relationships.

First Generation:

Randall Revell 1(1A) born 16132 in England, but of French descent3 died late in 1685 in Somerset, Maryland. Will written 27 May 1685, Probated 8 Mar 16864 married:

1st. About 1635 to Rebecca Nichols (1A1) died ca. 1642 in St. Marys County, Maryland.
2nd. Katherine Scarburgh5 (1A2) born 1635 married ca. 1658 in Manokin, MD. died Saturday, 5 May 16886 in Somerset County, Maryland. Daughter of Edmund Scarburgh and Hannah Butler. (See Maryland Revell's for line of descendancy)

It is well documented that Randall first appeared in Virginia and gave testimony during the February 1634 term of court in Northampton Court on 19 Feb 1634 in which he gives his age as 21or thereabouts.. Prior to that date there is no record of his having been in America. In fact this court appearance marks the beginning of Randall's fifty-one year history on the Eastern Shore of Maryland and Virginia. After reviewing countless passenger lists and other opportunities for travel, it is my conclusion that Randall Revell was a passenger on either the Ark or the Dove. The Ark and the Dove entered Hampton Roads harbor and stopped for a short time at Point Comfort, Virginia disembarking several unknown passengers (of which Randall was one) and delivering messages from the king between the 24th and 27th of February 1634. It would appear that a five-day difference between these two historical events exists that prohibit the possibility of Randall being such a passenger. I propose that the difference in these dates can be explained by errors contained in the Julian calendar.

The Julian calendar had been known to be inaccurately recording time. In the year 1582 the majority of the then known world set aside the Julian calendar in favor of the more accurate Gregorian calendar. Unfortunately, England and the American colonies did not adapt the Gregorian calendar until September of 1752. Over time many of the original colonial documents have been re-transcribed and quite possibly when this was done did not account for the differences in these calendars. This simple action could easily create a difference of up to ten days in the originally recorded dates. I propose that this divergence accounts for the difference in the five-days time recorded between the time the Ark and the Dove first landed in Point Comfort and the time it took Randall Revell to disembark and cross the bay to the Eastern Shore and appear before the Northampton Courts.

It is also known that Randall Revell was reported to be cooper, planter, merchant, yeoman and gent. And that he owned a boat and often traded on the upper Chesapeake Bay plying the waters between Virginia and Maryland. This clearly demonstrates that he was a man of some financial means and substantiates the likelihood that he was able to pay for his passage to cross the ocean to reach America. Rebecca Miller, Director of the Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture in Salisbury, Maryland and another Revell descendant, believes that Randall actually lived at the Manokin settlement for many years prior to filing his claim for land there. I believe that a close examination of the known facts support this conclusion. The record shows that Randall began distribution of his Virginia holdings as early as 1656 and continued with this practice until 1657. Upon completion of his duties in the House of Burgesses (1657/8) he married Katherine Scarburgh at Manokin in 1659. He continued to live in both Virginia (Pungoteaque) and Manokin. In 1662 Randall and Ann Toft were granted a patent for 3000 acres of land at Manokin7 and he finally officially immigrated in 16638.

Swepson Earle states in Maryland's Colonial Eastern Shore on page 66 "Coming with Governor Leonard Calvert and his "Pilgrims" on their voyage across the Atlantic in the Ark and Dove to establish the Province of Maryland was Randall Revell, it is said." From Point Comfort the Ark and Dove sailed on to the Potomac River arriving on 3 March and landing at St. Clement Island on 25 March 1634.

It is my belief that Randall disembarked at Point Comfort and crossed the bay only to make his way up the Eastern Shore of Virginia (Accomacke) and on to St. Marys, Maryland where he established a semi-permanent residence from 1636 to 1642. During this trip he arranged many important business relationships with other merchants and acquired a boat and a wife, Rebecca, who was the relic of an unknown Nicholls. Rebecca had a son from her first marriage named John and this is the same person referred to latter as son-in-law in Randall's disposition of cattle in 1657.

Randall was back in St. Mary's County in 1636 and patented land at Greene's Point, alias Randall's Point, a freehold of 100 acres of land due him for transporting himself into Maryland. The land was surveyed 17 Oct 1640 and patented the same day and year. Later, Randall was awarded 300 acres of land for transporting himself, his wife Rebecca and sons John and Richard into St. Mary's County which was surveyed on 14 Dec 1641 and patented on 6 Jul 1642. The following sources document these events.

Liber 1 Folio 19             Randall Revell transported 1638 St. Mary's County

28 April 1640 Randall Revell demandeth One hundred acres of land due him by conditions of plantation for transporting himself into this province Anno 1636.

28 April 1640 I would have you lay out for Randall Revell One hundred acres of land upon the point called "Greens' Point" and is for so much due him by Conditions of Plantation for transporting himself into the Province at his own charge in the year 1636 and to draw him a Patent for it in Freehold and this shall be your warrant.         Signed,         Leonard Calvert

17 Oct 1640 Laid out for Randall Revell a Neck of land within the Manor of West St. Marys called "Georges' Point" bounding on the east south and north with the St. Georges' River on the west by with a line drawn cross the woods belonging at the west-most branch of the creek called "Oyster Creek" and ending at the head of a bite on the south side of Thomas Surgeons Creek called "Cooper Bite"- containing in the whole One hundred acres or thereabouts.

Liber 1 Folio 65         John Revell, son of Randall transported since 1634 St. Mary's County
   
                        Rebecca Revell wife of Randall transported since 1634
   
                        Richard Neville, man-servant of Randall transported since 1634

25 Jul 1641Randall Revell demandeth One hundred acres of land for transporting Rebecca, his wife into this province and fifty more for transporting his son, John since the year 1634 and one hundred more for 1 man-servant, Richard Nevill and one hundred more assigned from Thomas Letherborow.

25 Aug 1641             Randall Revell assigned his right in fifty acres unto Richard Nevill.

Liber ABH Folio 79         Randall Revell immigrated 1636 to St. Mary's County
   
                             Rebecca Revell, wife of Randall transported 1634-1641
   
                             John Revell, son of Randall transported 1634-1635

14 Dec 1641. Laid out for Randall Revell a parcel of land lying on the south side of Britton's (Breton) Bay bounding on the east with a line drawn from the head of a marsh called "Randall's Marsh" south into the woods for the length of thirty-five perches on the south with a parallel line drawn to the west from the end of the former line into Brittons Bay and on the west and north with the said Bay- containing three hundred acres or thereabouts.

Randall owned a boat and used that vehicle to continue crossing back and forth between Maryland and Virginia and the eastern and western shores of the Chesapeake Bay. At this point Randall owned a total of 400 contiguous acres at Brittions (Breton) Bay in St. Marys County. Rebecca died in late 1642 in St. Marys County and Randall decided to relocate back to Northampton County, Virginia. John Nichols his step-son and Edward Revell referred to in his Last Will and testament as his only son, born in St Marys County in 1638 went with him. The following sources document these events.

29 Nov 1642 The said Randall Revell surrendered his patent unto his Lordships hand to the use of Jane Cockshott-widow.

Know ye that we, for and in consideration that Randall Revell, being seized in a fee of a certain freehold, part of the manor of West St. Maries, by virtue of a grant to him the said Randall from us by patent under our great seal, bearing date 17 Oct 1740, hath surrendered into our hands the said grant to the use of Jane Cockshott, widow, doe therefore hereby give, grant and confirm unto the said Jane, all that neck of land called "Green's Point", &c. ut in Revell's patent. Given 29th Nov 1642

Source: Liber 1 Folio 24 as found in the Archives of Maryland Volume 73 Page 211.

While several researchers have stated that Randall and Rebecca had three sons, (John, Richard and Edward) in reality he had only one son from this marriage. John was John Nichols, Randall's son-by-law or stepson and Richard was Richard Nevill, Randall's manservant with whom he crossed the Maryland and Virginia state lines many times together. As is also well documented Richard Nevill was an indentured servant and a recorded passenger aboard the Ark and the Dove.

In late 1642 Randall moved back to Virginia. In preparation for his return to Virginia, Randall deeded 50 acres of land in St. Mary's County to Richard Nevill on 25 Aug 1641. I presume that this gift of land was given in satisfaction of Richard's faithful service to Randall.

Randall reestablished his family in the Pungoteaque area and remained there until the late 1650s when he remarried to Katherine Scarburgh and began plans to return to Manokin. While residing in Northampton County (formerly Accomacke), Virginia Randall deeded some cattle to my son in law (stepson) John Nichols (April 1656) and later in August 1657 deeds cattle and horses to his only son Edward. In 1658 he married Katherine Scarburgh and prepared to relocate to Somerset County, Maryland where he was founder of the settlement at Manokin, a member of Lord Baltimore's land commission for the Eastern Shore, a large landowner and where he resided until his death in 1685.

While there is no accurate list of the passengers the arrived on the Ark and the Dove all indicators point to the conclusion that he was indeed a member of that original group.

Randall Revell born 1613- (see his disposition 19 Feb 1634 Northampton Records) in which he gives his age as 21. "John Waltham aged 24 years, Randall Revell 21 years and John Ford 25 years or thereabouts sworne and examined say that "they heard Henry Charleton say that if he had had Mr. Cotton without the church yard he would have kicked him over the Pallyzados calling him black cotted raskoll."

Source: Northampton County records 1634

Randall Revell 21 Feb 1638/9 Participated in the St. George's Hundred election for Burgesses from (Accomacke) Northampton County, Virginia. Randall voted for David Wickliff.

Source: Liber MC

Randall Revell 2 Mar 1641 was on a list of free men and listed as a member of the Maryland Assembly. Source: Liber MC Pages 171, 174 & 178.

Tyler's Quarterly Magazine Page 142 reports that "Randall Revell was living in Northampton County in 1646."

It is ordered by the Court that the difference dependant between Thomas Leatherbury Plaintiff and Randall Revell, be referred to the next Court and the cause to return sufficient. Dated 18 Jan 1649
Source: Orders Deeds and Wills 1651-1654 Book IV Page 39

The deposition of William Starling taken 28 July saith that (to the best of his remembrance) in the month of March 1649 being at Thomas Leatherbury his house Randall Revell asked him (if he would have an ox of Mr. Drew's) which was then in the town fields. But Thomas answered him not, he could not pay him for it further. This desponent remembereth that he answered him, part of an ox (which he bought for a ton of cask) and Thomas told him he was willing and would have that for which he was to pay two hog heads (empty cask) one in hand and the other when he would demand it, but the said Thomas was to help Randall to look for the ox (when he should give him notice). More saith not per William Starling

Whereas Thomas Leatherbury hath made appearance to the court by the despositions of William Starling that Randall Revell standeth indebted to him for (for half an ox) which he pleadeth he can not satisfy (in specifics). It is therefore thought fit and ordered that the said Randall Revell shall forthwith make payment unto the said Thomas Leatherbury the sum and quantity of three hundred pounds of tobacco and cask (being the same rate he should the half ox for) and pat charge in the suit atr exec. Dated Jan 1651. Note: This suit was finally settled on 24 May 1652 on page 82 of the same referenced book.
Source: Orders Deeds and Wills 1651-1654 Book IV Folio 76

It is ordered by the Court that Hungale Baker shall forthwith make payment unto Randall Revell the sum and quantity of three hundred and fifty pounds of tobacco due by September atr exec. Dated March 1650

Source: Orders Deeds and Wills 1651-1654 Book IV Page 12

According to Ralph Whitelaw in Virginia's Eastern Shore Randall purchased 200 acres of land (N31) in Northampton County from John Rosyer in 1647 and sold that land in 1655. Northampton County Orders, Deeds & Wills 1651-1654 Book IV by Frank V. Walczyk reports that Randall Revell was granted a certificate for 100 acres of land (page 243) In 1652 a certificate for 500 acres (Page 87) and in 1653 a certificate for 500 acres (Folio 213).

4 Jul 1652             500 acres             Orders, Deeds and Wills 1651-1654 Book IV Page 87
   
                                          for transportation of 10 persons. (Whitelaw's plot A52)

14 Dec 1653         500 acres             Orders, Deeds and Wills 1651-1654 Book IV Page 213
   
                                          for transportation of 10 persons. (Whitelaw's plat A52)

"The Engagm't tendered to ye Inhabitants of Northampton County,

Eleaventh of March, 1651 (O. S.)

"Wee whose Names are subscribed; doe hereby Engage and promis to bee true and faithfull to the Commonwealth of England as it is nowe Established without Kinge or House of Lords.

25th OF MARCH

Nathan'll Littleton Obedience Robins Edm. Scarburgh Edm. Douglas
Peter Walder Wm. Andrews, Sen'r Allex Addison James Barnabye
Jno. Pannell Sam'll Sone Jno. Denman James Berry
Phillip Farrant Jno. Ellis Jeffery Minshatt Georgine Hacke
Rich. Hamby Edw. Harrington Nich. Waddelone Argoll Yeardley
Wm. Waters Wm. Jones Thos. Sprigge Jno. Dye
X'ofer Major Wm. Munds Francis Flood Stph. Stringer
Zephyr Jarvis Nice. Scott Ankh. Hodgskins Jno. Nuthall
Wm. Whittington Wm. Coake Ben Cowdrey Levyne Denwood
Robert Andrews Ben. Mathews Jno. Stringer Allex. Harryson
Rich. Vaughan Thos. Johnson Dan'll Baker Thomas Hint
Thos. Higby Jno. Parkes Wm. Stanley Jno. Akers
Robert Harryson   Luke Billington Randolfe Hutchinson  Nice. Granger
Thos. Truman  Allex. Madoxe  Henr. Armitradinge  Steph. Charlton
Jno. Parramore Jno. Robearts  Zephyr Dixon Robert Marryott

TRICESIMO DIE MARTY 1651 (o. s.)

Jno. Custis Jno. Johnson, Jun.  Farmer Jones  Jno. Dixon
Jno. Taylor  Mathew Stone  Tobine Selve  Rich. Nottingham
Nehemiah Coventon Francis Morgan  Wm. Ward Jno. Johnson, Senr.
Edw. Southren Jno. Merryfin  Dan'll Chadwell  Jno. Teeslocke
Jno. Coulson  Jno. Michaell  Jno. Cornley  Rich. Newell
Jno. Lee Phill. Merrydayr  Edw. Moore Jno. Brillyant
Ambrose Dixon Wm. Horose Robt. Blake  Rich Hill
Jno. Hott  Edw. Marshall Jno. Dolling Charles Scarburgh
Walter Williams WM. Stephens Jno. Thatcher  James Johnson
Elial Hartree  Charles Ratliffe Jno. Graye  Jno. Willyams
Randall Revell Wm. Smyth Wm Custis  Tho. Miller
Robert Baily  Jno. Whitehead  Armstrong Foster  Sam'l Calvert
Wm. Adrews, Jun'r  Francis Goodman Jno. Willyams Wm. Corner
Rich Smyth  Jno. Rutter Andrew Hendrye Antho. Carpnter
Jno. Wise   Wm. Taylor Jno. Waleford  Mick Richett
Rich Bruducke Thos. Clarke Thos. Crecro  Sam'l Jones
Hen. White X'ofer Calvert  James Adkinson  Wm. Gower
Wm. Boucher Jno. Johnson, Jr.  Wm. Jordan  Rich. Smyth
David Wheatley  Robert Berry  Wm. Preeninge  Tho. Butterie
Jno. James Tho. Price  Rich. Baily  Rich. Hudson
Rich. Alleyn Jno. Lewis Jno. Johnson, Senr.  Wm. Gaskins
Nicholas Jueyre Stephen Horsey  Jno. Robinson Symon Bailey
Jno. Hinman Jno. Coulson  Phill. Mathews Edw. Leene
X'ofer Kirke  Thos. Savage  Sam'll Smothergall  Wm. Colebourne
Alex Maddoxe Sam'l Powell  James Brewce  Wm. Luddington
Sam'll Robins Jno. Garnell  David Kiffyn Jno. Edwards
Wm. Mellinger Raph'll Hudson Rich. Teggar  Samuel Goldfine
Wm. Moultor Wm. Browne Edm. Mathews

Recordantur vicesimo die Augusty Ano. 1652.
   
                                                                 Teste Edm. Mathews, Cloc. Cur."

Source: Copied from Ye Kingdome of Accawmacke or the Eastern Shore of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century by Jennings Cropper Wise Pages 135-137)

Northampton Protest

"The xxxth of March, Ano. 1652

"Wee whose names are under written this daye made choyce of by the Inhabitants of Northampton Countie in Virginia to give Informacons and Insruccons to ye gent Ellected Burgesses for this prsent Grand Assemblie (in relacon to such matters as conduce to our peace & Saftie). And For ye Redresse of those aggreevances wch (att prsent) wee are capable & sensible of in our Countie of Northampton.

"Imprmis. Wee the Inhabitants of Northampton Countie doe complayne that from tyme to tyme (pticular yeares past) wee have been submitted & bine obedient unto the paymt of publeq Taxacons. Butt after ye yeare 1647, since yt tyme wee Conceive & have found that ye taxes were very Weightie. But in a more espetiall manner (undr favor) wee are very sensible of the Taxacon of fforty sixe pounds of tobacco p. poll (this present yeare). And desire yt ye same bee taken off ye charge of ye Countie; furthermore wee alledge that after 1647, wee did understand7 suppose or Countie of Northampton to bee disioynted & sequestered from ye rest of Virginia. Therefore that Llawe wch requireth & inioyneth Taxacons from us to bee Arbitrarye & illegall; fforasmuch as wee had neither summons for Ellecon fo Burgesses nor voyce in their Assemblye (during the time aforesd) but only the Singlur Burgess in September, Ano., 1651. Wee conceive that wee may Lawfullie ptest agt the pceedings in the Act of Assemblie for publiq Taxaconswch have relacon to Northmton Countie since ye year 1647.

"The Gent who are (att rsent) to speak inour behalfe can sufficiently declare what is necessary to bee expressed to this effect wch wee referr to them.

"Our desire is that there may bee an annual Choyce of Magistrates in Northmton. And, if our Countie may not have ye privilege of a peculir govrmt & propriety (att prsent) granted wth in our prcincts that then you Request and plead that all Causes, Suit of Tryalls ( of what nature soevr) may bee concerned (for future tyme), determined in our sd Countie fo Northampton. "If there bee a free & genr. all vote for a Governor wherein they shall Ellect Mr. Richard Bennett Wee the inhaitants of Northampton Countie wth unanimous consent & plenary aprobacon Rendr our voyce for te sd Esq. Bennett.

"The people doe further desire that ye Taxacons for fforty sixe pouds of tobac a heead maye not bee collected by the sheriffs (until ansrw of the questions form the Grand Assemblie nowe summoned).

"Witness our hands subscribed the day & yeare aforesd.

Stephen Charlton Wm. Whittington
Llevyne Denwood Jno. Ellis
Jno. Nuthall  Steph. Horsey

"Recordatr Decimo Mense May, 1652, p. me Edm. Mathews, Clic. Cur."

Source: Copied from Ye Kingdome of Accawmake or the Eastern Shore of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century by Jennings Cropper Wise Pages 139-140.

Randall and many other noted Eastern Shoremen signed the 'Northampton Engagement" in 1652. History records that many of these persons later removed to Somerset County to more freely pursue their religious beliefs and avoid legal action in Virginia. The following attachment offers an excellent explanation of these events.

The seventeenth century was a tumultuous time for England. She was constantly at war, either with her self or other nations. Questions about succession continually plagued the government. Civil war, as well as difficulties with Holland, Spain, France, Ireland, and others, was a part of daily life for most in England, but how did this affect people in her colonies? Were the people in America, specifically Maryland and Virginia, concerned about these issues? How, if at all, did the changing governments in England affect the running of the colonies in America? Two lists, one from Northampton County, Virginia, in 1651/1652, and one from Somerset County, Maryland, in 1689, give some insight to how people in these areas felt about the political maneuvering in England at the time.

Before discussing the two lists, a background of what was going on at the time in England is appropriate. The list from Northampton County appears at a time in which the English government was changing. England was in the midst of a civil war that began in 1642, during the reign of Charles I. When Charles came to the throne in 1625, he had very specific ideas about how he would rule. In this process he became the catalyst that pushed England into civil war. According to John Morrill, a Stuart historian, "Charles blithely ruled as he thought right and did little to explain himself."

By 1629, Charles and Parliament had already polarized over many issues. They disagreed over foreign policy, fiscal expenditures needed to fund that policy, over the use of imprisonment to enforce those expenditures, and over the king's sponsorship of a new minority group within the church, whose beliefs and practices sharply diverged from the developing practice and teachings of the Anglican mainstream.

It was in this same year that Charles decided to rule without Parliament. "He was, however, alienating a huge majority of his people by his religious policies."

People began to believe that Catholicism was being let in secretly. Charles could have managed without Parliament if he could stay out of war, but he could not. In 1637 he became involved in a war with the Scots. He had to call Parliament for money. It was with this Parliament that Charles lost any credibility he may have had left.

No one had intended to increase the powers of the two houses, but only to insist that Parliament be allowed to meet regularly to discharge its ancient duties. By 1641 a wholly new view had emerged. It was that the king himself was so irresponsible, so incorrigible, that Parliament, on the people's behalf, had a right to transfer to themselves powers previously exercised by the king.

According to John Morrill, Charles' actions had forced many people into a more radical constitutional position. His religious views were alienating the gentry who were gaining control of Parliament. In 1642 civil war broke out.

By 1648 Charles I was captured and was negotiating with Parliament. This was not good enough for Oliver Cromwell, the leader of the New Model Army. On December first of 1648, Cromwell ordered the army to reoccupy London. "Colonel Thomas Pride was ordered to purge the commons of dissidents, deducing it to a 'Rump' of about 150 members."

Charles was tried and executed in 1649. The army, through Parliament, was now in control and was calling government a Commonwealth, without a king or House of Lords. In October of 1651 the Commonwealth "passed the first of the Navigation Acts, designed to break the hold of the Dutch on the carrying trade between Europe and America and within Europe, and it embarked on the resultant war in 1652 with the utmost self-confidence."

These events are the basis for what was going on in Virginia, more specifically Northampton County, in 1651/52. "In March, 1652, Captain Dennis arrived at Jamestown and demanded the surrender of the colony to Parliament, and after a slight delay, and no resistance, the capitulation was ratified on the 12th of the month."

These articles made the colony of Virginia subject to the Commonwealth. Virginia was to seek out a new charter from Parliament because she "should have the ancient bounds and limits granted by the charters of former Kings.

The council appointed for the Commonwealth of Virginia sent its two members from Northampton County, Nathaniel Littleton and Colonel Argoll Yeardly, back to collect signatures of the residents of their county.

One hundred and sixteen people signed the document which stated: The Engagm't tendered to ye Inhabitants of Northampton County, Eleaventh of March, 1651 (O.S.) Wee whose Names are subscribed; doe hereby Engage and promise to bee true and faithfull to the Commonwealth of England as it is nowe established without Kinge or House of Lords.

This oath of loyalty, on its own would suggest that the residents of Northampton County were loyal to the new government in England. However, there is another document called The Northampton Protest, which may suggest otherwise. This protest stems from the problems between the English and the Dutch, and a lack of representation of Northampton County in Virginia's Assembly.

The "tax of forty-six pounds of tobacco per poll" which had been levied on the Eastern Shoremen was a cause for complaint. "Parliament, which at first had found much support on the peninsula, especially among the middle classes and the tradesman, soon lost favor." This grievance combined with laws like the Navigation Acts and the prohibition of Dutch trade had eaten away at the Parliamentary Party in Northampton. A spirit of independence soon resulted, and influential royalists took advantage of this. These royalists "appealed to the people to resist the unjust burdens imposed upon them by the Assembly at James City, and to assert their independence of a government in which their sole participation was to defray its expense."

People began to assemble daily to listen to the agitators. "After several days of such excitement, six prominent citizens of the county were selected by vote of the people to draw up a protest against their present condition and to act in all things as the best interest of the people might demand."

On March 30th a protest was drawn up by some of the same people who, days earlier, had signed the oath of loyalty to the Commonwealth.

Stephen Charlton, Llevyne Denwood, Jno. Nuthall, Wm. Whittington, Jno. Ellis, and Steph. Horsey were the six people chosen to draw up the document. This was the first "form of a protest against taxation without representation."

Jennings Cropper Wise, author of Ye Kingdome of Accawmacke, suggests that this document "was a direct protest against the authority of the Commonwealth of England, which from March 12th, to April 30th, 1652, was represented by Parliamentary Commissioners, not chosen by the people, nor any section of the people of Virginia."

If this is the case, why did the people of Northampton sign the loyalty list at all? It is impossible to determine exactly why the people of Northampton changed their minds so quickly. However, the Northampton Protest appears to be directed at the Virginia government that was in power before the Commonwealth took over.

If this is the case, residents of Northampton were most likely loyal to the Commonwealth, or at least signed the oath because it was the thing to do. If Wise's assertion is correct, one could suggest that force may have been used to obtain the signatures.

A similar loyalty list can be found in Somerset County in 1689. This list, like the one from Northampton, was a result of events in England. Here another short explanation of these events is necessary. Like Charles I, James II was not highly regarded by his contemporaries. Also like his father, James dissolved Parliament, however, he never recalled it during his reign. This allowed him to pursue whatever he pleased. He began replacing key figures in government with lords of Roman Catholic sentiment.

Popish institutions were also established, a chapel in the city, a Jesuit school at the Savoy, a girls school in St. Martin's Lane, a Franciscan friary in Lincoln's Inn Fields, one for the Dominicans near by, a Benedictine house in Clerkenwell. A papal nuncio was publicly received at court. Steps were taken to revive a Roman Catholic hierarchy by the consecration of bishops.

James II alienated the Church of England, and to regain the support he lost, he was forced to accept all-round toleration. "He renewed the attempts to relieve the protestant nonconformists and so to gain their support and that of the more liberal element in the established church." James also granted full liberty of worship in public places only, through a new declaration of indulgence. Even with this effort, people in England were wary about an openly Catholic monarch.

Most were comforted by the fact that Mary, James' sister and also a Protestant, was next in line to the throne. This comfort was shattered in 1688 with the birth of a son to James. This son would surely be raised Catholic and people in England did not want another Catholic monarch. Something had to be done. William of Orange, Mary's husband, was secretly invited to invade England to "rescue the nation and the religion."

Seven high officials signed the letter inviting William to come to England. "The letter pointed out that 'people generally' were dissatisfied with the government's behavior in regard to religion, liberties, and prosperities, 'all of which have been greatly invaded'."

The letter also spoke of the support they expected to get from the gentry and masses. Evidently, some people did not believe that the Prince of Wales, James' son, was really his. This made it easier for people's consciences to deal with the legitimacy question that was raised by passing over the king's son for his sister and brother-in-law. The invitation gave William the opportunity to use England in his war against the French. William decided to accept the invitation to invade England and was successful. This invasion is also known as The Glorious Revolution. This success meant changes for the colonies, particularly Maryland, whose pro-Catholic sentiments were widely known.

In the year 1692 Maryland became a royal colony. This was after its own "glorious revolution" in 1689. When the colony came directly under the control of King William, the Church of England was established in Maryland. In the few years preceding this act, the Protestants, under the leadership of John Coode, ran the government in Maryland.

On the second of June, 1692, the assembly passed an "Act of Recognition" declaring William and Mary the sovereign king and queen of England. The official Church of England was set up with "An act for the service of almighty God, and the establishment of the Protestant Religion."

In Somerset County, where religious sentiment had always been strongly Protestant (specifically Presbyterian), an oath of loyalty to William and Mary was signed in 1689. It is entitled: "Address of the Inhabitants of the County of Somersett November the 28th 1689"

This oath of loyalty fit perfectly in the chronology of events of Maryland at the time. Up until a few years before "The Protestant Revolution" in Maryland, Somerset County had defended Lord Baltimore against accusations that he had favored the Roman Catholic religion and in appointment to office had favored men of that faith.

'In April, 1689, writes Scharff in his History of Maryland (volume I, p. 309), 'An Association in arms for the defense of the Protestant religion and for asserting the right of King William and Queen Mary to the province of Maryland and all the English dominions, was formed at the head of which was placed John Coode.'

By July of the same year the "Associators" had seized the government and they sent an address of loyalty to William and Mary. Coode called for an Assembly to be held in St. Mary's City on August 22, 1689, in which four representatives from each county were to be present. Francis Jenkins and his associates, from Somerset County, arrived late, on the last day of the session. Jenkins and the others explained that they had heard about all that was done by the Assembly, "but indeed they intended to own no other power but their Majesties, which excuse was readily accepted neminine contradicente9."

After this meeting in St. Mary's City, the people of Somerset considered themselves free of Calvert control. They were thrilled to have Protestants in control of government and religion. Interestingly enough, only those who would take the oath of allegiance to William and Mary were eligible for holding any office. This certainly gives incentive for potential signers, other than any feelings they may have had about its religious and political meanings. Somerset County was known for being a stronghold of Presbyterianism. Three of the signers of the oath were Presbyterian ministers: William Traile, Thomas Wilson, and Samuel Davis10.

This shows that the document was not aimed specifically at Anglicans. Rather than asking why someone signed the document, a better question would be: Why wouldn't they sign it? The same holds true for the Northampton list. It was in a person's best interest politically, and maybe even religiously, to go with the tide and sign the list. One could hypothesize that one reason for the Northampton Protest was the difference in religious beliefs between the signers and the leaders of the Commonwealth. Since Virginia's beginning, the established church was Anglican. This would certainly put them at odds with the Puritans.

More likely, however, the protest was drawn up as a reaction to the taxes Northampton residents had to pay, even though they did not have a representative in the Assembly. Most people probably signed the loyalty list because it was the proper thing to do, if one wanted to have any political or social power.

Although these lists are signed in two different colonies and in two different years, they are related closely enough that a comparison of names is justified.

The counties, although in two different colonies, border one another. This suggests the possibility of movement between the two areas. There are several similar family names on both lists. Names like Coulbourne, Smyth, Elzey, Scarburgh, Revell, and numerous others. There were also names that were exactly the same, with the exception of minor differences in spelling.

Thirteen names can be found on both lists. They are: William Coulbourne, Randall Revell, Richard Hill, John Browne, Charles Ratclife, William Smyth, William Browne, John Johnson, John Gray, John Ellis, Alexander Maddux, John Tayler, and John Williams.

Although these names are the same, the people on the first list are not the same people on the second list. An examination of Wills show that John Browne, John Gray, John Ellis, and John Tayler died in Northampton County and could not have signed the list in Somerset. The remaining group either died too early to be on the list or could not be found in the Somerset or Northampton records. From discussion with Dr. Ray Thompson and Rebecca Miller, who have both done extensive research in this area, one could determine that a number of families moved form Northampton to Somerset during the time period between the two lists.

Although it appears that no one person signed both lists, the descendants of the signers of the 1651 document are those common names that are on the 1689 list. Further research would determine the relationship between these names. [Randall Revell Senior signed the list in Northampton County in 1651 and his son, Randall Revell Junior signed the list in Somerset County as Randall Senior died 4 years hence on 27 May 168511 in Somerset, Maryland his will was probated 8 Mar 168612]

The loyalty list from Northampton County in 1651, the Northampton Protest of the same year, and the loyalty list from Somerset County in 1689 all give information about the effects English politics had on a small area in the colonies of America. The fact that they exist show that there was at least some concern with what was going on in England, for whatever reasons they may be.

Politics certainly played a role because of the requirement that one could not hold office if they did not sign the list. The religious and social reasons are there but are more difficult to prove. The existence of these lists allows a small view into the relationship between England and her American colonies.

Paper written by Carolyn Lowman (1997 graduate)
SALISBURY STATE UNIVESITY STUDENT PAPER
Department of History (
Reprinted with Permission)

On 27 Oct 1653 Tepitiascon King of the Great Nussawattocks deeded 1000 acres north of Pungoteaque Creek to Randall Revell. That same month the Great Men of Onancock made complaint to the Court that Randall Revell, Hugh Yeo and John Jenkins refused to give them satisfaction for their land on Pungoteaque Creek. The Court ordered payment be made.

This day Great Men of Occancocke made complaints against Randall Revell, Mr. Hugh Yeo, and John Jenkins (now seated upon Indian land) that they have omitted and do refuse to give them satisfaction (for the land they now live upon) at Pungoteaque, according to terms of agreement for prevention of further disturbances, or molestation. It is ordered by the Court that the said Randall Revell, Mr. Hugh Yeo and John Jenkins, do (by the next court to be held at Occahannocke, the 7th of April) make the Indian payment for their land or otherwise the said Revell, Yeo and Jenkins are here by required to make their appearance before the commissions at the court aforesaid appointed at Occahancocke 7th April next to answer the suit of the Great Men the Oanancocke Indians to stand and abide such order as the Court shall determine. Dated 7 March 1654. Source: Orders Deeds and Wills 1651-1654 Book IV Folio 225

In that same year [1654] Mrs. Mary Scarburgh disposed to the Court: That about the 14th day of July last, Randall Revell came up to Occohannocke to this disponents husband's house and there told me that the Governor was come over the Bay and was coming to take away all that we had and to make seizure thereof."

In 1656 Randall witnessed the Last Will and Testament of Wachawamp, the last Indian King

"The Last Will and Testament of Wachawampe Indian Emperor. My will and desire is that none should rule but only my daughter and I do give her my two guns together with my house with all my household goods and all whatever I possessed. Further my will is that Noremachetum and Wonascahon and Roapeto shall govern until my daughter come to years of Government according to our custom in that … and after my daughters decease that my brother's son whose name is "Atomepen" posses and rule my people and that in case both the aforementioned die then I bequeath all before mentioned and the rest unto my dead brother's son Guimaheto. Also whereas I formerly … my land out of love and affection I always did bear to ye English. It is my desire that they will continue their love to my said heirs and that they live at Ockahannock or Wachapreaque but that I leave to their choice. But in case they make choice of Wachapreaque which I think most convenient then my desire is that the English will procure a patent for their land. This I declare to be my will and testament this 26th day of January 1656.

                The mark of Wachawamp Indian Emperor X

Signed in presence of George Parker, Randall Revell, and George Powell. Also in the presence of the four above mentioned Great Men, Wachawamp and daughter.

Randall was a member of Virginia House of Burgesses 1657/813 and was appointed Justice of Accomack County during the period prior to its separation from Northampton County in 1659 & 1660.

A list of Northampton County residents dated Jan 1660 containing the names of Randall Revell & Edward Revell. Source: Assession File 1984.12.141.02 located at Nabb Research Center in Salisbury, Maryland

During his lifetime Randall was a cooper or a wire cooper, planter, a merchant holding several thousand acres of land in Northampton County (Accomack), Virginia, a Yeoman and a Gent. He owned a boat and traded actively in those counties that border on the Chesapeake Bay. In 1644 Randall removed from St. Mary's County in Maryland for upper Northampton County, Virginia and established his home at Pungoteaque. Reading the Order Books establish that Randall was quite active in the community from 1650 through 1660 when he again returned to Maryland and helped form Somerset County.

In 1662 a land patent was issued by the Province of Maryland for 3000 acres on the South side of the Manokin River to Randall Revell and Ann Toft. In 1664 another Land Patent was issued by Virginia for the same 3000 acres of land. In 1665 Lord Baltimore again reissued a new patent for the same 3000 acres of land. Randall officially relocated to this property in 1663 and began raising his second family known as the Revell's of Maryland.

Second Generation:

Children of Randall Revell14 (1A) and Rebecca Nichols Revell (1A1)
   
         Edward Revell15 (2A) born 163816 died 168717 married Frances18 Unknown (2A1) died 23 Jun 169719 will probated 3 Aug 1697.

Note: Rebecca Nichols Revell had a son named John from a previous marriage. John Nichols (1634-1663), Randall's stepson died in Accomac County, Virginia without issue. John left a nuncupative will was made between December 1662 and May 1663 leaving his land in Accomack and estate to his stepbrother Randall Revell Junior and his stepsister Ann Revel then residing in Maryland. John had patented 400 acres in 1655 and Randall Senior deeded him some cattle in 1656. John renewed this patient in 1660 and later it was reassigned to James Bonwell who died in 1667. John Revell repurchased 150 + acres of this land in 1790. Many of the Revell's lived in this same area for hundreds of years.

Edward was a successful planter holding several thousand acres of land in Northampton County (Accomack), Virginia. He received these lands from his father and from several patents granted by the state for transporting persons into the Colony. The following Certificates for Patents were awarded to Edward.

27 Nov 1652 500 acres  Patent Book #3 Page 233
10 Jun 1654  500 acres Patent Book #3 Page 233 for transportation of 10 persons.
6 Mar 1671 2100 acres Orders 1671-1673 Page 68
17 Nov 1671  450 acres  Orders 1671-1673 Page 69
18 Sep 1672  1600 acres  Orders 1671-1673 Page 132 (Rights were reassigned from Hugh Yeo)
18 May 1681  300 acres  D&W 1678-1682 Page 221
23 Feb 1663  1000 acres  Reassigned Patent of William Berkley to Revell & Jackson (500 acres)
16 Aug 1683 500 acres  Wills & Admin. 1682-1697 dated 16 Aug 1683 Page 18
3 Oct 1673  500 acres  Division of 23 Feb 1663. Called "Nickawamson

500 acres at Nickawamson was given to Rebecca and Robert Coulbourn.

After reaching a settlement with Charles Scarburgh in 1682 this land was divided in half. The resulting 975 acres at the "Great Neck of the Matomkins" was given to Rachel and Henry Custis. (A68)


This day Mr. Edward Revell brought an Indian boy to ye court belonging to Matomkin to have his age judged, and was by the court named "James Revell" and judged eleven years of age.
  Source: Accomack County Book 3 Page 40 dated 25 Oct 1667.

Edward was given a young Indian boy by the Chief of the Matomkin tribe to live with him and learn the ways of the English. The young man was taken into court to have his age judged. The court gave the young man an English name of James and the last name of the family he was to live with as was the custom in those days. James served Edward by managing some of his property and help to raise pigs. Several local men were infuriated with James' abilities and beat him very severely. James returned to his tribe to recuperate from his injuries. Later after he recovered he was killed by unknown person(s). Edward Revell was granted letters of administration on the estate of James Revell, Indian, as being the greatest creditor. Source: Accomack County Book VIII Page 271dated 18 Nov 1681.

Edward Revell of Accomack, Gentleman, with the consent of Frances my wife, to our loving daughter Rachell, the now wife of Henry Custis of the aforesaid County, Gentleman, our son in law- Deed of Gift. 975 acres, being one halfe of 1950 acres situate at a place called the Great Neck in the said County bounded according to patent granted to me the said Edward Revell bearing date the 23 March 1671/2 or by a patent bearing date the 29 September 1671, for and during their natural lives, and after the death of both of them to their heirs male and female for want of heirs male. 15 June 1683 recorded 16 Aug 1683.  Source: Accomack County Book VI Page 346

Henry Custis developed this property and built Ravenswood there. The property remained in Custis hands for over 200 years. The list of successful owners is as follows:

Ravenswood

Edward and Frances Revell to Henry and Rachael & Henry Custis 1683
Henry Custis to Edward Custis 1709
Edward Custis to William Custis 1739
William Custis to John Custis 1766
John Custis to Henry Bagwell Custis 1808
Henry Bagwell Custis and Elizabeth F. to William H. B. Custis in 1817
William H. B. Custis and wife Emma V. S. Conquest to Jane H. and Alice E Custis 1889
Alice E Custis died 1917
Jane H. Custis died 1918 willed to 3/4 Edwin P. Conquest & 1/4 to Edwin P. Conquest
Edwin P. Conquest sold to his father Pleasanton L. Conquest & wife Emma P. Conquest
Edwin P. Conquest & Pleasanton L. & Emma P. Conquest sold to Alfred J. Lilliston 1920
Sold to Dr. J. Fred Edmunds by Commissioners in 1936
Sold to Mrs. Phoebe Hall Valentine & son Robert H. Valentine in 1937 Still There.

Source: Ralph T. Whitelaw: Virginia's Eastern Shore, Page 881

Edward was the Commissioner for Accomack County being duly sworn on 16 Oct 1666. Later he served as a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses representing Accomack County in the 1683/1684 term.  Source: Journal of Virginia Assembly, list of members of House of Burgesses.

LAST WILL & TESTAMENT of EDWARD REVELL
October 6, 1686

To Frances Custis, daughter of Henry Custis and Rachel, his wife, one silver Tankard stamped "HY" and
            if
Mr. Jonathon Mathews brings me in one dozen of Silver Spoons, then I give and bequeath four of them to
ye said Frances, also one dark gray mare branded "E R" with all her increase.

To daughter Rebecca Revell, the plantation at Nickawamson whereon Samuel Beech now liveth, being
        500
Acres, with all cattle thereon male and female, and if there be not ten cows and calves besides cattle, then 
they shall be made up ten from this my plantation at Pungoteaque, also two mares, on horse and one horse
colt, all branded "E R"; all hogs marked "R R", one silver Tankard and four silver spoons. Should she die
without issue then all the aforesaid estate, real and personal, shall be and return to my son, John, and 
        should
they both die without issue then the estate at Pungoteaque to revert to Frances Custis, daughter of the
aforesaid Henry Custis, and the estate at Nickawamson to Elizabeth Custis, also daughter of the said 
        Henry.

I give to Dorothy Washbourne one Cow and Calfe to be delivered the May after my death.

My wife to have her maintenance on this plantation at Pungoteaque during her widowhood, and at the day 
of her marriage to have her bed and furniture, her wearing clothes her horse and saddle.

All the rest of my estate, real and personal I bequeath to my son John Revell, but should he die without
issue the same to go and remain unto the said Rebecca, and for want of heirs then the estate at
Pungoteaque, real and personal, to go and remain unto the said Frances Custis, and that estate at
Nickawamson, real and personal, to the said Elizabeth Custis. Son John Executor. Witnesses:
John Washbourne, John Fenn, Daniel Ograhorn, Jr.

Source: Accomack County, Virginia Will Book 6 dated 6 October 1687-1717 Proved 17 Jan 1687/8 Page 461

Many researchers have stated the Rebecca was the only surviving daughter of Edward Revell. Edward's and Frances' will prove otherwise.

Last Will & Testament of Francis Revell
23 Jun 1697

Frances Revell died 23 June 1697 at the house of her daughter, Rebecca Coleburn and left a nuncupative will as follows: To Frances Coleburn personality; to Frances Custis personality; To Frances Revell personality. Daughter Rebecca Coleburne, daughter Custis. Proved by Johannah Ogleby and Sarah Beech. Recorded at the request of Mr. Henry Custis and Mr. Robert Coleburne.

Source: Accomack County Wills and Administrations Book XI 1692-1715 166 and Wills and Administrations of Accomack County, Virginia 1663-1800 Page 29 as complied and edited by Stratton Nottingham.

Third Generation:

Children of Edward Revell (2A) and Francis Unknown Revell (2A1)
        Rachael Revell (3A) born ca. 1659 died 3 May 172020 married 1683 to Captain Henry Custis
        (3A1)21 born 1657 died 1 Feb 170822 son of Captain William Custis23 and Joan Hall Stockley24
   
     relic of Francis Stockley. Henry's half-siblings are John Stockley, Frances Stockley married to
   
     Edward Sacker and Ann Stockley married to Thomas Bagwell25.

        Rebecca Revell (3B) born ca. 1661 died ca.1710 married:
   
             1st. Robert Colbourne (3B1), born 1658 died 6 Apr 169826, son of Col. William 
   
                  Coulbourne died 22 Jan 1689 and Anne Unknown of Somerset County, MD.
   
             2nd. 1701 to Francis Wharton, Jr. (3B2)27 born 1665 died after 1735 son of Francis
   
                 Wharton and Elizabeth Welbourne28

        John Revell29 (3C)30 born ca. 1662 died 31 Aug 172631 married before 5 Jan 1695 to Agnes
   
           Burton (3C1) born ca. 1664 daughter of William Burton32 and Ann Stratton

Last Will and Testament of Henry Custis
28 May 1698

In the name of god: Amen: the 28th day of May 1698: I Henry Custis of ye county of Accomack in Virginia, being sick and weak in body but of sound and perfect memory thanks be to Almighty God for the same; and calling to mind ye uncertain state of this transitory life: do make this my Last Will and Testament in manner and form following. First, I bequeath my soule to Almighty God my maker and to Jesus Christ my redeemer: and to ye Holy Ghost my sanctifier and my body to ye earth from whence it came to be buried in such a decent and Christian manner as to my Executors shall be thought meet and convenient. And as for my temporal estate which the Lord hath been pleased for above my deserts, to bestow upon me I do ordaine, give, bequeath and dispose the same in manner and forme following. Imprimus: I give unto my wife one feather bed with the furniture thereto belonging which she likes best.

Item: I give unto my son Reavell Custis one gunn I bought of Fran: Lee and my pistols and holsters sword and belt.

Item: I give to my son Henry Custis one gunn called "Old Surry", and also the halfe of all my carpenters, joyner and turners tooles. The other halfe of my aforesaid tooles I give to my son Joseph Custis also one gunn I bought of Robert Coburn (Coulbourne).

Item: I give unto each of my daughters one heaffer of two years old to be delivered and set apart for their use the first day of my insuring probate of this will. And lastly, I make and constitute and appoint my Deare and well beloved wife, Rachell Custis, sole Executrix of this my Last Will and testement to whom I bequeath all the remainder of my goods and chattles whatsoever during the time of her widowhood for her to make use of towards maintaining and bringing up my children. If my said wife shall depart this life before she marry again, then she to dispose of ye same as she thinks fitt among my children, but if my said wife should marry again then the above remainder of goods and chattle or what is remaining or any wise belonging as ye produce of them to be equally divided among my wife and children according to ye intent and meaning of the first Act of Assembly made in October anno 1673. I do hereby nominate and appoint my said wife tutrix to my children until such time as they shall severally attain their ages of one and twenty years my sons, and sixteen, my daughters. But if my said wife should marry again then I do appoint and set my sons at age when they obtain to eighteen years of age and then to have their part or portion delivered to them and the girls to have their portions delivered to them when they shall obtain the age of sixteen that is if my said wife should marry again. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written.

                                                                                                                                                Henry Custis

Thomas Ironmonger
The mark of Mary ironmonger
The mark FC of Francis Crosten

The within Last Will and Testament of Henry Custis was proved in open court of Accomack County By the Oaths of Thomas Ironmonger and Francis Crosten which was allowed as sufficient proofs and ordered to be put upon Record - February ye First 1708

Teste Robert Snead CL Cur
Recorded March ye 3th 1708             Robert Snead CL Cur

Last Will & Testament of Rachell Custis
Written on 8 Dec 1718  Probated on 3 May 1720

To son Edward, son Henry, son Joseph, son Revell, daughter Rachell Custis, daughter Jane Custis, daughter Ann Custis, daughter Francis Stringer, daughter Elizabeth Shield, daughter Sarah Watson. To grandson John Stringer, grandson William Sacker Shield, grandson William Custis, granddaughter Ann Watson. Son Edward Custis and Thomas Stringer executors. Witnesses John Metcalfe, Charles Scarburgh and Charles Scarburgh Junior. Source: Wills, Deeds and Administrations Book VI 1715-1729 Page 255 as per Wills and Administrations of Accomack County, Virginia 1663-1800 compiled and edited by Strafford Nottingham on Page 63.

Last Will & Testament of Robert Coulbourne
Written on 6 Apr 1698 Probated on 7 Jun 1698

To son Robert Coulbourn plantation where I now live. To daughter, Francis 50 acres in Maryland called Prayers Neck. To my unborn child, if a son, 200 acres in Maryland called Heart Ease, if a girl the whole divident containing 250 acres to be divided between my daughter, Rebecca and that daughter which is yet unborn. Wife, executor. Witnesses: William Nock, James Lee, Johanna Pgleby. Rebecca Coulbourne, widow of Robert, qualified. Sources: Wills and Administrations of Accomack County, Virginia 1663-1800 compiled and edited by Stratton Nottingham on Page 30.

Note: Land Records of Somerset County, Maryland by to Ruth T. Dryden Page 208 and 209 report that a portion of Hearts Content (50 acres) called Prayers Neck was owned by Francis Coulbourne, the orphan of Robert Coulbourn of Virginia. In 1739 Robert Coulbourn of Accomack County, VA, son of Robert (and Rebecca) sold 50 acres to Patrick McClemmy. On 28 July 1729, William Coulbourne of Accomac County, VA with wife, Temperance Coulbourn sold 200 acres to Henry Miles. This sale clearly demonstrates that a son inherited the land according to the will of Robert and also lends strong credence to the possibility that William and Rebecca Coulbourne were in fact twins.

John Revell, son of Edward and Frances Revell, was born ca.1662 in Accomac County, Virginia. John married Agnes Burton on 5 Jan 1695. Agnes was the daughter of William Burton and Ann Stratton. Agnes died in 1727 at the home of her daughter, Rachael Upshur and is buried at "Warwick" a plantation near Quinby, Virginia.

John and Agnes built "Vaux Hall" near the Pungoteague, Virginia family plantation, which still stands today. John died before July 4, 1727 in Wachapreague, Accomac Co., VA33.  John Revell's will dated 31 Aug 1726 and probated 4 Jul 1727 -Accomac Courthouse XVI part II -p.137.

Agnes BURTON and John REVELL had the following children:
   
     Frances Revell born prior to 5 Jan 169534. (believed to have died in 1725/6)
   
     Elizabeth Revell born prior to 5 Jan 1695 married Steven Horsey
   
     Edward Revell Capt. born prior to 5 Jan 1695 died 1753 mar. Rebecca Colebourne.
   
     Rachel Revell born 1702 died 1749 mar. Abel Upshur.
   
     Sarah Revell born prior to 6 Sep 171135 mar. Thomas Wharton
   
     Ann Revell born prior to 6 Sep 1711 died 6 Nov 1756
   
     Mary Revell born 17xx. (Mary's existence discovered in Ann's LW&T.)

Last Will and Testament of William Burton
5 Jan 1695 18 Feb 1695

To eldest son William land on the seaboard side, situate in Forked Neck near where I now live.

To third son, Thomas Burton, the south side of the said Forked Neck.

To sixth son, Stratton Burton, land purchased of Col. John West and adjacent to the land given to Thomas.

To second son, John Burton, 500 acres being 1/2 of 1000 acres in Sussex County in the Territories of Pennsylvania granted me by patent called Long Neck.

To 4th son Benjamin, 600 acres near Assateague on the seaboard side in Somerset County, Maryland. The other 1/2 of the 1000 acres in Sussex County was conveyed
By me to Thomas Bagwell, of Accomack, deceased.

To 5th son, Joseph Burton, 387 1/2 acres on the North side of Indian River in Sussex County, PA being 1/2 of 775 acres purchased of John Parker.

To 7th son, Woolsey Burton, 387 acres being the other 1/2 of said tract.

To sons William, Thomas and Stratton my interest in Cedar Island in Accomack County.

To 8th son Jacob Burton, 450 acres in Lewis Town in Pennsylvania on the Indian River, being part of 600 acres purchased of Thomas Jones and adjacent the land given my son, John - the other 150 acres was due William Bagwell of Accomack.

To 9th son Samuel Burton 500 acres on the South side of Indian River.

Wife, Ann Burton. To daughter Agnes Burton- to grandchildren Frances, Elizabeth and Edward Revell. Wife Ann and son William Executors.

Captain William Custis, William Nock and son-in-law, John Revell overseers in Accomack and John Hill of Lewis Town, PA. Witness: John Revell, Robert Scott, James Smith, and Robert Edge. Accomack County Will Book 1692-1715 Page 100

Source: Wills and Administrations of Accomack County, Virginia 1663-1800.  Page 26 compiled and edited by Stratton Nottingham

Last Will and Testament of
Ann Alexander Written 6 Sep 1711 Probated 4 Mar 1712

Ann Alexander was Ann Stratton the relic of William Burton.

To son Stratton Burton. To son William Burton, To my son William's son William. To son Thomas Burton. To son Thomas Burton's wife and his two children Thomas and Patience. To Ann Burton, daughter of my son Thomas. To son Benjamin Burton and his son William, daughter Ann and son, John. To my son Joseph and his son. To son Stratton's daughter Leeze. To son Benjamin's wife, Elizabeth. To son Woolsey Burton. To sons Jacob and Samuel Burton. Granddaughter Agnes Burton. Granddaughters Elizabeth and Ann Revell. To son in law John Revell. To Granddaughters Rachell and Sarah Revell. To grandson Edward Revell. Son William executor. Witnesses William Custis and Christopher Brookes, John Daggen.

Source: Accomack County Wills and Administrations Book XI 1692-1715 Page560 and Wills and Administrations of Accomack County, Virginia 1663-1800 Page 47 as complied and edited by Stratton Nottingham.

John Revell and his mother Francis had several disagreements concerning his fathers (Edwards) will and her dower. The problem continued to the point that both resorted to law suites. Many court dates were continued and the final outcome wasn't resolved until Francis died just before reaching what was to be a final settlement.

Last Will and Testament of John Revell
31 Aug 1726

In the name of God, Amen. I John Revell of County of Accomack in the Colony of Virginia, Gent: being weak in body but of sound mind and memory thanks be to Almighty God for it. Do therefore make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner following. First, I give and bequeath my soul into the hands of Almighty God who gave it. Trusting that in and by the merits of my blessed Savior Jesus Christ I shall have eternal salvation. And for such worldly goods as the goodness of God hath bestowed on me I do dispose of in manner follows:

Imprimus: I give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth now the wife of Stephen Horsey of Somerset County in Maryland all that part of my estate already given and delivered to her, and to the heirs of her body forever. Also a young mare now running on my island on the seaside.

Item: I give and bequeath to my daughter Ann Revell a young mare and a horse also her choice of a bed of furniture suitable also her equal fourth part of all unmade linen and new pewter and her equal fourth part of all my table linen and sheets. Also I give to my said daughter Ann a Negro girl called Nan and a Negro boy called Isaac to her and to the heirs of her body lawfully begotten, but if my said daughter Ann dies without such heirs then I give the said two young Negroes, Nan and Isaac to my two daughters Rachael and Sarah Revell and to their heirs. Also I give my said daughter a Doubloon and four pistooles of gold. Also a silver quart tankard marked on the fore part with the letters "F R A" and her equal fourth part of all my silver spoons. Also an iron pot of four gallons and pot hooks and a good frying pan. Also I give my said daughter ten head of cattle and ten sheep and liberty to keep the same on my island during her continuing unmarried. I also give to my said daughter, one Elm chest.

Item: I give and bequeath to my daughter Rachael now wife to Abel Upshur, Gent: her second choice of a feather bed and furniture suitable also her equal fourth part of all unmade linen and new pewter and of my table linen and sheets. I also give to my said daughter Rachael a Negro boy called Daniel and a Negro girl called Sarah to her and to the heirs of her body forever. Also I give my said daughter a Rachael, a silver quart tankard marked with the letters "F R A" and her equal fourth part of all my silver spoons and a Double Loone of Gold. Also an iron pot of four gallons and a good frying pan. Also I give her ten head of cattle and ten sheep and one Elm chest.

Item: of a feather bed and furniture suitable also her equal fourth part of all unmade linen and new pewter and of my table linen and sheets. Also I also give to my said daughter Sarah a young Negro wench called Hannah and a Negro boy called George to her and to the heirs of her body lawfully begotten forever. And for want of such heirs, then to the next heirs of me the Testator forever. I also give my said daughter a silver quart tankard not by me already given and her equal fourth part of all my silver spoons, also an iron pot of four gallons and pot hooks and a good frying I give and bequeath to my daughter Sarah Revell her third choice pan. Also I give to my said daughter ten head of cattle and ten sheep and liberty to keep the same on my island during her continuing unmarried. Also I give my said daughter a Doubloon of Gold, also a silver Bason and two old silver spoons also an Elm chest.

Item: I give to my granddaughter Sarah Revell a Doubloon and small gold ring, also I give to my granddaughter Rachael a Doubloon.

Item: I give to my son, Edward Revell all the remaining part of my Estate not already given both real and personal both in Virginia and elsewhere to him and his heirs forever.

Lastly, I do hereby nominate constitute and appoint my son, Edward Revell to be my sole Executor of this my last will and testament. As witness my hand and seal this 31st. Day of August in the year of our Lord 1726.

Signed, Sealed, Published and Declared by me                         John Revell             seal
To be my last will and testament in the presence of

Henry Scarburgh
Nathan Addison
Luke Foscue

At a court held for Accomack County September the July 4th. 1727. The above last will and testament of John Revell deceased was proved in court by the oaths of Col. Henry Scarburgh, Nathan Addison and Luke Foscue in open court witnesses thereto; it was admitted to the record.

                                                                                                                John Jackson Clerk of Court

Examined

Source: Accomac County Clerk of Court Will Book 1715-1729 Part II, Pages 137 and 138.

Fourth Generation:

Children of Rachael Revell Custis (3A)36 & Henry Custis (3A1)
   
     Frances Custis (4A)37 born ca.168438 married 8 Dec 1719 to Thomas Stringer (4A1) born 1683
   
          died 29 Sep 174739, son of Captain Hillary Stringer and Mary Savage.

         Elizabeth Custis (4B)40 born ca.1685 died prior to 1742 married prior to 1705 to Delight Shield
   
         (4B1) died 16 Nov 174241.

        Edward Custis (4C)42 born ca. 1687 died 3 Jun 1739 will probated 1 Aug 173943 married
   
                 1st. Unknown (4C1)
   
                 2nd. Patience Allen (4C2) died 2 Oct 174444 daughter of Edmund Allen and Margaret Drummond.

        Revell Custis Sr. (4D) born 1696 died 29 May 174445 married Sarah Revell (5BP) his first cousin,
 
        daughter of Edward (4T) and Rebecca (4M) Revell46

        Henry Custis Jr. (4E) died 26 Nov 175147 married to Tabitha Scarburgh (4E1)48 born 1683 died 1761 
             daughter of Edmund Custis of Deep Creek and Tabitha Scarburgh.

        Joseph Custis (4F) born ca. 1694 died 27 Jan 1746/749 in Messongo, VA married to Mary Onley
   
       (4F1)50 daughter of John Onley Jr. and Unknown.

        Jane Custis (4G)

        Ann Custis (4H)

        Sarah Custis (4I) born ca. 1706 dead by 27 May 174051 married Thomas Watson (4I1) died by 25 Jun 173952.

        Rachael Custis (4J) born ca. 1708 in Accomac County. Married Hathan Fettaplace Chandler 
      
    (4J1) died 1763 son of John Chandler and Margaret Unknown.

Children of Rebecca Revell Coulbourne (3B) & Robert Coulbourne (3B1)

        Robert Colbourne (4K) born ca. 1694 died 25 Mar 175253 married Elizabeth Taylor (4K1) daughter of William Taylor54
        Frances Colbourne (4L) born ca. 1696 died 175x55 married John Parker (4l1)56 son of John Parker and Bridgett Sacker57.
        Rebecca Colbourne (4M) born 169858 died 22 Feb 1757 married Edward Revell (4V) son of John (3C) & Agnes (3C1) Revell
 
    William Coulbourne (4N) born 1698 died 175159 married 1743 to Temperance Unknown (4N1) died 26 Jan 1767

Letter to Bo Lewis, Mayor of Cheriton, Virginia November 2002

Bo:

In looking through the family notes on the Descendants of Randall Revell that you gave me last September (2002) I originally questioned the relationship of Frances Coulbourne to John Parker III as the footnote offered referenced an unrelated document on page 140 of Stratton Nottingham's Wills & Administrations of Accomack County 1663-1800. To this end, I sent you a short email requesting clarification and just filed your paper in a side drawer. Well I finally found a little time to do more research and while I can not prove the relationship; I also can not disprove it as well. What I discovered is that many facts are just as you stated.

Page one & two of your document state that the children of Rebecca Revell and Robert Coulbourne were: Frances, Robert, Rebecca and William Coulbourne. To this end you offered Robert Coulbourne's LW&T of 1698 as proof. Robert Coulbourne did name his existing children in his will and referenced an unborn child (Rebecca). While the reference is correct, I did not originally believe that he (Robert) had a son named William. However, after further research have concluded that Rebecca and William were in fact twins.

In Robert's will he left 50 acres of land called "Prayers Neck" located in Somerset County, Maryland to his daughter, Frances. According to Ruth Dryden page 208 of Land records of Somerset County, Maryland Prayers Neck was a portion of a larger piece of land called "Hearts Content." Robert Coulbourne patented this land in 1677. The land records indicate that Robert left 50 acres to his daughter Frances in 1698 just as the will reported. Additionally, the Rent Rolls for this land shows that Frances from 1698 through 1723 the land belong to Frances, the orphan of Robert Coulbourne in Virginia. This fact establishes that Frances remained in Virginia and did not relocate. William Coulbourne inherited the remaining 200 acres of land mentioned in his father's will and William and his wife Temperance later sold this land in 1739.

Secondly, and the point that most interested me is the reference to Frances Coulbourne as the wife of John Parker, son of John Parker and Bridgett Sacker. You used page 140 of Stratton Nottingham's Wills & Administrations of Accomack County 1663-1800, which contains no reference to any Parker or Coulbourne. So I did some digging.

I found a John Parker Sr. of Mattapany wrote his LW&T on 9 Jan 1692 and was probated on 19 Sep 1695  (Stratton Nottingham's Wills & Administrations of Accomack County 1663-1800 page 24 paperback version printed in 1990) who lists his children and wife in the following order.

George Parker, John Parker Junior, William Parker, Matthew Parker, Thomas Parker, Anderson Parker and wife, Amy daughter of Garrett and Amy Anderson (Whitelaw page 823).

John Parker's LW&T written on 26 Jan 1720/21 and proved on 7 Feb 1720/21 list heirs as:
John Parker, Sacker Parker, William Parker, George Parker, Abigail (Parker) Wise (married Johnannis "John" Wise) Ann Parker, Frances Parker Wise who also married John Wise,* Amy (Parker) Drummond, Bridgett Parker and Betty Parker. He mentions his wife but does not give her name. He also mentions that his son John has four children; John, Frances, Robert and William Parker.

* Whitelaw Page 949.

The fact that this John Parker was reported to have married Bridgett Sacker is given a lot of creditability just by the names used within the family as a son carries the family name of Sacker and a daughter carries the mother's name of Bridgett. However the icing on the cake is Francis Sacker's Administrations on page 20 of the same book which states that the Administration of the estate to John Parker, Jr.- Francis Sacker brother of Bridget Parker, wife of John Parker, Jr. 17 Jan 1687. This confirms that John Parker, Jr. and Bridgett Sacker were husband and wife and that they did indeed have a son named John Parker III.

An interesting note is that Bridgett Sacker is the daughter of Edward Sacker and Francis Stockley. Their children were Francis Sacker, William Sacker and Bridgett Sacker. When Ed died Frances Sacker remarried to Capt. William Custis brother of General John Custis (Whitelaw page 1289 and father of Henry Custis who married Rachael Revell and founded Ravenswood.

The LW&T of John Parker, Sr. 25 Aug 1754 proved 1 Jan 1755 contained in the same book on page 182 names sons as John Parker, William Parker, Robert Parker, Anderson Parker, Edward Parker; daughters as Frances (Parker) White, Susannah (Parker) Wise and four more daughters as Ann Lacey, Rachel Boggs, Betty Guy and Bridget Parker. Wife is named as "Frances." While this does not prove that this particular "Frances" is indeed Frances Coulbourne your story matches and considering that all other facts were correct I am inclined to believe that you have valid documentation for your family history.

Randall Revell and his first wife Rebecca Nichols had a son Edward Revell. Edward married Frances Unknown and had a daughter Rebecca Revell who married Robert Coulbourne, son of Col. William Coulbourne and Anne Unknown and younger brother of Capt. William Coulbourne.

Randall Revell and his second wife Katherine Scarburgh had a daughter Anne who married Capt. William Coulbourne Junior, son of Col. William Coulbourne and Anne Unknown.

As you can determine there is a triple relationship here between the Coulbourne and Revell families. As later Edward Revell son of John and Agnes Revell married Rebecca Coulbourne daughter of Rebecca Revell Coulbourne and Robert Coulbourne and sister of Frances Coulbourne that married to John Parker.

This is the reason that I am especially interested in Frances Coulbourne.

Your Cousin,
Jim Revell

Children of Rebecca Revell Wharton (3B) & Francis Wharton, Jr. (3B2)
   
     John Wharton (4P) born before 1710 LWT written 5 Sep 1742 proved 30 Oct 174460 married Elizabeth Bagwell
              (4P1) died prior to 5 Sep 1742 daughter of John Bagwell and Tabitha Scarburgh.

          Elizabeth Wharton (4Q) born before 1710 died 20 Oct 174861 married Thomas Bagwell (4Q1) died by 
              26 Feb 173962 son of Thomas Bagwell II and Elizabeth Eyre.

          Revel Wharton (4R) born before 1710 died 28 Apr 174163 married Bridget Custis (5M)64.

Children of John Revell (3C) and Agnes Burton Revell65 (3C1)
   
     Frances Revell (4T) born prior to 169566  (Possibly married to George Rodgers)

          Elizabeth Revell (4U) born prior to 1695 married 1735 to Stephen Horsey III (4U1) born 18 May
       
     1693 died 8 Oct 175467 in Somerset County, MD son of Hannah Revell Horsey and Stephen Horsey of Somerset, MD.

         Edward Revell (4V) born prior to 1695 died ca. 25 Sep 175368 married to Rebecca Colbourne (4M) born 
              ca. 1698 died 7 Nov 1756 daughter of Rebecca (3B) & Robert Coulbourne
(3B1))

         Rachel Revell (4W) born 1702 died 25 Dec 174969 married prior to 172670 Abel Upshur (4W1)
   
         Born 1702 died 30 Oct 175371 son of Arthur Upshur II and Sarah Browne

         Anne Revell (4X)72 born prior to 171173 died 6 Nov 1756.

         Sarah Revell (4Y) born prior to 1711 married Thomas Wharton (4Y1) born ca. 1703 son of
        
    Robert Wharton and Rachael Ellis

         Mary Revell (4Z) born after 1711 is believed to have married Zorobabel Rodgers (4Z1) who
        
    died 29 Jan 179374 son of Zorobabel75 and Maltida Rodgers76. (This fact remains to be proven).

Last Will and Testament of Anne Revell
6 Nov 1756

In the substance of the nuncupative will of Anne Revell who died the sixth of November 1756 Viz.; " I give all my estate to my two sisters Sarah and Mary".

At a court held for Accomac County 30 November1756.

The within nuncupative will of Anne Revell, deceased, proved by the oaths of John Ashley and Katherine Pitt two of the witnesses thereto and admitted to be recorded. And on the motion of Mary Revell taking the oath and giving Katherine Pitt and Samuel for security who entered into and acknowledged a bond for that purpose Certificate is granted to her for obtaining Letters of Administration on the said sister, Anne's Estate with her will annexed.

Source: Accomac County Clerk of Court Will Book 1752-1757 Page 357.

Edward Revell married his first cousin, Rebecca Colbourne, daughter of Rebecca and Robert Colbourne. Edward died 1753. Rebecca died in 1757. Children:
John Revell married Leah Corbin after John's death Leah marries William Seymour
Agnes Revell marries Stephen Horsey
Catherine Revell marries James Scott
Sarah Revell marries Revell Custis (her cousin)
Rachael Revell marries     1. Thomas Leatherbury
   
                               2. Joshua James
   
                               3. William Tilney III

Captain Edward Revell was sworn High Sheriff of Accomack County 5 Aug 1725.  Source: Virginia Records Volume 19 Page 35.

Captain Edward Revell was sworn Justice of the Peace for Accomack County 1726.  Source: Lost Virginia Records Volume 19 Page 35.

Last Will and Testament of Edward Revell
27 Mar 1753

In the name of God, Amen. I Edward Revell of Accomack County Virginia being of perfect mind and sound memory thanks be given to God but calling to mind the uncertainty of this life and knowing that it is appointed for all men to die do make this my last will and testament. First, I bequeath my soul to the Almighty God who gave it to me and my body to the earth to be decently entered as my Executors shall think proper and as to my worldly estate do give it as followeth:

Imprimus: I give and bequeath to my loving wife, Rebecca Revell my five Negroes named Jack, Peter, America, Phaford and Hannah during her life and at her decease, Jack, Peter, America and Phaford to descend to my son John and Hannah to my daughter, Agnes Horsey. To my wife I give the choice of all my horses. My hogs. I also give to my wife

Secondly, I will and bequeath to my son, John all my land, island and water mill; four Negroes named Robin, Gray, Simon and Jim to him and his heirs lawfully begotten forever. Failing him, the land, island and water mill with Robin, Gray, Simon and Jim to be equally divided between my two daughters, Agnes Horsey and Catherine Revell with the four slaves above mentioned to be equally divided between my said daughters after the decease of my wife, the lawful heirs of my son John failing. I do also give my son John my large silver tankard marked IRA, my silver tobacco box. One half dozen large silver spoons, one pair of gold studs with all my … buttons, my large cropper and looking glass with all my carpenter and cooper tools. Five maps, all my books, tow horses, one mare, five ploughs, five tongs and of iron doggs, one large pot and fort hooks … my … desk and china punch bowl and two-thirds of my cider casks with twenty head of cattle and twenty head of sheep, two oxen and one half of my hogs. I further give to my son, his choice of anyone of my feather beds and furniture thereto belonging and of my best chair also my mill and brandy mill to his mother as above said.

Thirdly, I bequeath unto my daughter Agnes Horsey four Negroes named Will, Philip, Sailor, and Hannah above named to her and her heirs lawfully begotten forever. I … give unto said daughter my silver tankard which holds about one quart, one half dozen large silver spoons, one half dozen tea ditto tongs, … head of sheep, one young mare and ten pounds Bush. I give unto William Curtis, my grandson one cow and a calf.

Fourthly, I bequeath unto my daughter Catherine Revell four Negroes named Darky, Africa, George and Robin forever. I younger two small … tumblers to her and her heirs lawfully begotten forever. I likewise give unto my said daughter one horse or mare with a woman's saddle and furniture thereto belonging with one half dozen large silver spoons, one half dozen tea ditto tongs and strainer with my chest Danvers with the liberty of the parlour chamber and pasturage for her cattle one of my main islands until married with one half dozen best chairs.

Fifthly, I give and bequeath unto my daughter, Rachael Tilney the choice of Sopharo England chairs.

Sixthly, I give and bequeath unto my granddaughter Elizabeth Leatherbury one Negro boy named Tom and one linen wheel.

Seventhly, I give and bequeath unto my wife and daughter Catherine all of my cattle and sheep not before given to be equally divided between them.

Ninthly and Lastly, I appoint my wife and son, John Revell Executors of this my last will and testament. Revoking by these presents all other wills by made me heretofore and I do publish and declare this and no other to be my last will and testament. Witness my hand and seal this twenty-second day of March one thousand seven hundred and fifty-three years.

Signed, Sealed and Published before                                         Edward Revell         seal

James Falconer
James Rodgers
Anthony West
John Curtis

At a court held for Accomack County September the 25th 1753. The within last will and testament of Edward Revell deceased was proved in court by the oaths of James Falconer and James Rodgers witnesses thereto and admitted to the record. And on the motion of John Revell, one of the Executors therein named took the oaths and giving James Rule and James Rodgers for his securities. Certificate is granted him for obtaining … thereof in … form.

                                                                                                            George Poulson Clerk of Court

Examined

Source: Clerk of Court Accomac County, Virginia Will Book 1752-1757. 22 Mar 1753 through 25 Sept 1753 Pages 200-202. LWT of Edward Revell and Will Book 1752-1757 Page 388. LWT of Rebecca Revell.

Last Will and Testament of Rebecca Revell
7 Nov 1757

In the name of God, Amen. I Rebecca Revell of Accomack County in Virginia being sick and a low condition of body but of perfect mind and memory thanks be given to God, but calling to mind the uncertainty of this life and knowing it is appointed for all men once to die do make this my last will. First, I bequeath my soul to Almighty God who gave it to me and my body to the earth to be decently entered as my Executors shall think proper and as to my worldly estate do give it as followeth:

Imprimus: I give to my son John Revell a …with …, a large chest, a diaper table cloth, six new plates, my (…), the young gray horse, a ( …), a dripping pan, a pair of sheets and a warming pan.

Item: I give to my grandson, Edward Revell a doubloon.

Item: I give to my grandson, Isaac Horsey a doubloon, a pair of silver (shot buchies), a pair of silver studs and a gold buckle.

Item; I give to my grandchild Elizabeth Revell Horsey a bed and furniture, a large diaper table cloth marked "R.R.", a doubloon, a large d… trunk, one looking glass and gold ring, my Negro Hannah and Harry, her child.

Item: I give to my cousin, Robert Parke a cow and a calf.

Item: I give to Edward Custis a cow and calf.

Item: I give to Nicholas Dunn a heifer.

Item: I desire the remainder of my cows, steers and calves may be equally divided between my son John and my daughter Catherine Revell.

Item: after all my debts are paid I give to my daughter, Catherine Revell all my money and all my outstanding debts also all my floor furniture, all my horses, mares, sheep and hogs ... that is on the ground not yet gathered and every thing or things belonging to me whatsoever, excepting what I have before given to the above.

Lastly, I appoint my son, John Revell and Catherine Revell, my daughter Executors of this my last will and testament. Revoking by these presents all other wills by made me heretofore and I do publish and declare this and no other to be my last will and testament. Witness my hand and seal this seventh day of November one thousand seven hundred and fifty-six.

Signed, Sealed and Published before                                             Rebecca Revell

Thomas Rule
James Scott
Thomas Bagwell.

At a court held for Accomack County February 22, 1757

Source: Accomac County Clerk of Court Will Book 1752-1757 Page 388.

On a bleak December night in 1749, Abel Upshur was aroused from sleep by the squawking of hens in the nearby fowl house. He climbed out of bed and hurried out into the yard to investigate the disturbance. It was a cold night and Abel had not been well. Rachel being concerned about his health slopped a robe over her nightdress and went out to beg Abel to return. She found her husband standing near the fowl house, and he told her that he had been unable to determine the cause of the disturbance or anything unusual although the fowls seemed much frightened. Together they returned to their doorstep where Rachel, standing in her bare feet, gently pushed Abel into the house with the admonition that he should catch his death of cold. Rachel paused a moment on the mill stone at the foot of the steps; hearing no further disturbance she turned to follow Abel into the house. At that instant a red fox affected with rabies came out from under the steps and bit Rachel on the heel. Nine days later she was seized with hydrophobias and died soon thereafter on Christmas night, being smothered to death between to feather beds, an old time precaution which was taken to guard against those so affected. Still at "Warwick" next to the doorstep is the old millstone on which Rachel stood when the fox bite her. On a rainy day or sometimes when the stone gets wet you can still see Rachel's blood reflecting in the light.

"Rachel was buried at Warwick about one hundred feet from the house. Abel planted a holly tree at the head at the head of Rachel's grave that grew to an enormous size, enfolding and lifting the tombstone. Abel died on October 30, 1753, and was buried by Rachel's side. The inscriptions on the tombstones read:

In Memory Of Abel In Memory
Upshur Who Died  of Rachel the Wife
October The 30th 1753 In of Abel Upshur
The 51 Year of his Age who died December
The 25th 1749 in the  47
Year of her Age

The above information was taken from Chapter IV Pages 31 & 32 of an unknown book.

Fifth Generation:

Children of Frances Custis Stringer (4A)77 and Thomas Stringer (4A1)
        John Stringer (5A) died 28 Jun 176878
        Fereby Stringer (5B) died 23 Feb 177979 married Rachel Unknown (5B1)
        Thomas Stringer (5C) died 12 Apr 1764 married Elizabeth Savage (5C1)80
        Ann Stringer (5D)
   
   Jacob Stringer (5E) died 22 Jan 176181 married Elizabeth Unknown (5E1)

Children of Elizabeth Custis Shield (4B)82 and Delight Shield (4B1)
        William Sacker Shield (5F) born ca. 1718 died 1762
        Rueben Shield (5G) died 29 Apr 1767 married Tabitha Unknown (5G1)83
        John Shield (5H)
        Rachel Shield (5I) married Abel Badger (5I1)84
        Elizabeth Shield (5J)
        Sarah Shield (5K)
        Anne Shield (5L)

Children of Edward Custis85 (4C) and Patience Custis
        Bridget Custis (5M) born ca. 1718 married Revel Wharton
        William Custis (5N) born ca. 1720 died 176686
        Thomas Custis (5O) born ca. 1722 married Sarah Smith (5O1) daughter of John Smith and
Rebecca Smith87.
        Ann Custis (5P) born ca. 1724
   
   Susanna Custis (5Q) born ca. 1726

Children of Revell Custis Sr. (4D) and Sarah Revell Custis (5BP)
   
     Henry Custis (5R)88 born ca. 1736 died 8 Apr 1795 married Polly White (5R1)89
   
             Will written 15 Dec 1800 probated 28 Jul 180190.
   
     William Custis (5S)91 born ca. 1738 died 25 June 1765 married Anne Unknown (5S1)
           Edward Custis (5T)92 born ca. 1739 alive 7 Nov 1756 named by Grandmothers will.
           John Custis (5U) born ca.1741 wrote LWT on 16 Sep 1763 proved 29 Nov 1763 married Sarah Unknown (5U1)
           Revell Custis Jr. (5V) born 1743 died 22 Feb 179193 married 1777 to Catherine Parker (5V1)94

Children of Henry Custis Jr. (4E) and Tabitha Scarburgh Custis (4E1)
   
     Scarburgh Custis (5W)95

Children of Joseph Custis (4F) and Mary Onley Custis
   
     Tabithia Custis (5X)
   
     Joseph Custis (5Y)96

Children of Sarah Custis Watson (4I) and Thomas Watson (4I1)
   
     Ann Watson (5Z)97

Children of Rachel Custis Chandler (4J) and Hathan Fettaplace Chandler (4J1)
        John Chandler (5AA) married Elizabeth Unknown (5AA1)
        Caleb Chandler (5AB)
        Hathan Chandler (5AC) died 1794
        William Sacker Chandler (5AD) died 1786
        Peggy Chandler (5AE)

Children of Robert Colbourne (4K) and Elizabeth Taylor Coulbourne (4K1)
        John Colebourne (5AG)
        Comfort Colbourne (5AH) married William Spiers (5AH1) died 14 Nov 1754

Children of Frances Coulbourne Parker (4L) and John Parker (4L1)98
        John Parker (5AJ)
        William Parker (5AK) died 1784 married Leah Michael (5AK1) daughter of John Michael.
        Robert Parker (5AL)
        Anderson Parker (5AM)
        Edward Parker (5AN)
        Frances Parker (5AO) married Unknown White (5AO1)
        Susannah Parker (5AP) married Unknown Wise (5AP1)
        Ann Parker (5AQ) married Unknown Lacey (5AQ1)
        Rachel Parker (5AR) married Unknown Boggs (5AR1)
        Betty Guy (5AS)
        Bridget Parker (5AT)

Children of William Coulbourne and Temperance Unknown Coulburne99
        Spencer Coulbourne (5AV) born ca. 1727
        Susannah Coulbourne (5AW) born ca. 1733 married William Huffington (5AW1) born 1738
        William Coulbourne (5AX) born ca. 1731
        John Coulbourne (5AY) born ca. 1735
        Ann Coulbourne (5AZ) born ca. 1729 died prior to 1767

Children of John Wharton (4N) and Elizabeth Bagwell Wharton (4N1)
        John Wharton (5BA)
        James Wharton (5BB) Administration of Estate dated 24 Feb 1795
        Ann Wharton (5BC) will dated 26 Oct 1765 proved 24 Jun 1766

Children of Elizabeth Wharton Bagwell100 and Thomas Bagwell (4O1)
        William Bagwell (5BD) died in 1753.
        Isiah Bagwell (5BE)
        Adah Bagwell (5BF)
        John Bagwell (5BG) born ca.1740 in Messongo, VA.
        Elizabeth Bagwell (5BH)
        Ann Bagwell (5BI)

Children of Elizabeth Revell Horsey (4U) (daughter of John & Agnes Revell) and Stephen Horsey III (4U1)
        Revell Horsey (5BK) died ca. 1781 married 1 Apr 1759 to Sarah Fossett (5BK1)101.
        Stephen Horsey IV (5BL) born ca. 1715 will written 2 Oct 1776102 in Somerset County, MD
                married ca. 1735 to Agnes Revell (5BS) daughter of Edward (4V) and Rebecca Revell (4M).
   
    John Horsey (5BM) died prior to Oct 1754103.

Children of Edward Revell (4V)104 and Rebecca Colbourne Revell (4M)105 Built Vaux Hall
        Sarah Revell (5BP) born ca. 1695 died ca. 1758 married Revell Custis Sr. (4D) born 1696 died
        1744106 son of Rachael (3A) and Henry Custis (3A1)

        Rachael Revell (5BQ) born ca. 1697 married:
   
         1st. 1740 to Thomas Leatherbury (5BQ1)107 born 1708 died 29 Mar 1748 son of Charles Leatherbury and Vallance Bagwell
   
         2nd. Joshua James108 (5BQ2) born ca. 1715 died 23 Jan 1749 son of Jonathan James and Mary Parker
   
         3rd. William Tilney III. (5BQ3)109 died 2 Jun 1774 son of William Tilney Jr. and Elizabeth Tilney

        John Revell (5BR)110 born ca. 1710 died ca. 26 Jun 1764 married ca. 1755 to Leah Corbin (BR1)111 born 1735 died ca. 
            25 Jul 1796112 daughter of Robert and Anne Corbin. After John's death Leah 2nd married William Seymour (5BR1A) 
            born 1737 died 1776113. Son of Digby Seymour and Rosie Powell114.

        Agnes Revell (5BS) born ca. 1715 died ca. 1770 in Somerset County, MD married ca. 1735 to Stephen Horsey IV
             (5BL) born ca. 1715 will dated 2 Oct 1776115 in Somerset County, MD in Somerset County, MD Son of Stephen III 
             and Elizabeth Revell Horsey

        Catherine Revell (5BT) born ca. 1718 died 11 Oct 1805116 married 1737117 to James Scott (5BT1)118.

Last Will and Testament of Catherine Scott
11 Oct 1805

Daughter of Edward and Rebecca Coulbourn Revell

In the name of God amen. I Catherine Scott of the County of Accomack in Virginia being of sound mind and disposing memory do make and ordain this my Last Will and testament in manner and form as follows namely:

Impremis: I give and bequeath unto Agnes D. (Drummond) Ker (daughter of George Corbin & Elizabeth Revell Horsey and wife of John S. Ker) during her natural life all of my houses and lots in Onancock Town except the lot adjoining George Layfield and at her death I give and bequeath the same to her oldest child then living and its heirs forever. But should the said Agnes D. Ker have no children at her death or should none of her children arrive at the age of twenty-one years, then I give and bequeath said lots and houses to William Revell, son of John and his heirs forever.

I also give and bequeath unto Agnes D. Ker my slave Phillip at Metomkin, old Hannah and old Bob and one case containing one dozen silver mountain knives and forks and 1/2 dozen silver spoons, one dozen cups and one dozen shallow china plates, five china …., my old and my young sorrel mare and one Dutch oven.

Item: I give to Catherine Revell Dunton six silver table spoons marked "S. S ", ten silver tea spoons, one silver soup ladle, one pair silver sugar tongs, one large hair trunk which stands in the parsonage and her choice of one other middle sized trunk, the sum of fifty pounds current money of Virginia, one suit of mourning, and one bed …..and furniture complete. The furniture for said bed to include two pair of coarse and two pair of firm sheets and to be chosen by Agnes D. Ker and Elizabeth Revell and the said Bed and furniture to remain in the care of the said Elizabeth Revell until Catherine R. Dunton shall arrive at age.

Item: I will and direct that the land I hold near Onancock, the lot in Onancock adjoining George Layfield and my interest in the lot and houses in Accomack Court yard be sold by my Executors upon such credit unto them that shall seem fair and the monies proceeding there from I give to be equally divided by William Revell, John Bagwell Revell, James Revell, Edward Coulbourn Revell and Elizabeth Rebecca Revell.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Sally Leatherbury daughter of Thomas, ten dollars.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Rachel Chandler one fine chest in the parsonage, one trunk upstairs covered with flower paper, ten pounds in money, one suit of mourning, one bed and furniture to be chosen by Agnes D. Ker and Elizabeth Revell and my … what.

I give unto Elizabeth Rebecca Revell young Hanna and all her children. The said Hanna to serve until her youngest child is two years old at which time she is to be free and her children are to serve until they obtain the age of twenty when they are to be set free. I also give to said Elizabeth R. Revell my silver tumblers.

Item: I give unto Margaret S. Revell one silver … and one gold sleeve buttons.

Item: I give unto Leah Bagwell Kellum my riding chair and the sum of ten pounds.

Item: I give to Edward H. Ker one pair of gold sleeve buttons marked "J.R.C."

Item: I give to Edward Revell son of Edward one pair of gold sleeve buttons.

Item: I give unto John S. Ker one black broad cloth coat.

Item: I give unto Nancy Dunton the sum of ten pounds.

Item: I give unto William Seymour one black broad cloth coat.

Item: I give to Susey White and Peggy Chandler two barrels of corn out of my crop.

Item: I will and direct that my Executors out of the proceeds of my crop furnish my Negroes namely Sampson, old Hannah, young Hannah, George, Bob, Affrica and Phillip with such things and at such times as they may think suitable for them to the … ten dollars each.

Item: the residue and remainder of my Estate I give to my nephew, John Revell after paying of just debts and charges to him and his heirs forever.

Lastly, I hereby nominate and appoint John S. Ker and John Revell Senior my Executors to this my last will and testament hereby revoking all former wills by me made. In testimony thereof I have hereunto set my hand and affix my seal this the eleventh day of October one thousand eight hundred and five.

Published and pronounced in presence of                                                 Catherine Scott             seal

Gilbert M. Leatherbury
Smith Ames

Source: Clerk of Court Accomack County Will Book 1804-1806 pages 496, 497 & 498.  Will proved on 27 Jan 1806.

Notes: Catherine Revell daughter of John and Elizabeth Revell married James Scott
   
John Revell Senior one of the Executors was Catherine's nephew. He died in 1806.

Children of Rachael Revell Upshur (4W) and Abel Upshur (4W1)
   
     Authur Upshur IV (5CA) born 1726 died 15 Jan 1784119 married 1755 to Leah Custis (5CA1) born 1731 
              died 1791120. Buried at the family burial ground "Warwick".

        Susanna Upshur (5CB) born 8 Jul 1733 died 7 Nov 1784121 married 12 Aug 1754 to Littleton Dennis (5CB1) 
             born 3 Feb 1728 in Somerset County, MD died 6 May 1774 son of John and Mary Dennis122.

        Elizabeth Upshur (5CC) born ca. 1740 died 14 Jan 1782 married 1757 to Thomas Treakle III123 (5CC1) born 
             11 Apr 1734 died 15 Aug 1784

        John Upshur (5CD) born 17 Sep 1741 died 9 Dec 1799 married:
   
             1st. 1763 to Ann Emmerson (5CD1) born 25 Aug 1745 died 9 Nov 1775
   
             2nd. 17 Mar 1781 to Margaret Downing (5CD2) born 1753
   
             3rd. 23 Jul 1794 to Rosina Robins (5CD3) born 1772

        Caleb Upshur (5CE) born 1744 died 24 Nov 1778124 married Ann Brown (5CE1). Buried at "Warwick" near Quinby, VA.

Children of Sarah Revell Wharton (4Y) and Thomas Wharton (4Y1)
            Captain Revel Wharton (5CF) born 18 Mar 1742/3 in Northampton County, VA. died 1776
                 and was buried at sea. Married 30 Nov 1763 in Snow Hill, MD to Mary Scroggins (5CF1)
                 born 13 Nov 1745 in Maryland died 1824 in Kentucky.

Children of Mary Revell Rodgers (4Z) and Zorobabel Rodgers (4Z1)
   
      Tabitha Rodgers (5CG) born ca. 1750 died 1800

Sixth Generation:

Children of Henry Custis (5R) and Polly White Custis (5R1)
        Henry Custis (6A) married Tabitha West (6A1)125
        William Custis (6B) married Malinda Bird (6B1)
        Sarah "Sally" Custis (6C) married William Wise (6C1)

Children of William Custis (5S)126 and Anne Unknown Custis (5S1)
        John Custis (6D)
        Sarah Custis (6E)
        Elizabeth Custis (6F)
        Leah Custis (6G)
        Unborn Custis (6H)

Children of John Custis (5U) and Sarah Unknown Custis (5U1)
        Robinson Custis (6J)
        Unborn Custis (6K)

Children of Revell Custis Jr. (5V) and Catherine Parker Custis (5V1)127
        George Custis (6M) born 1778 died 1843 married 1804 to Susanna Sullivan (6M1)128 died 1811. After Susanna
             died George moved in with his sister Margaret Custis who was married to Francis Ounley129.

        Henry Custis (6N) married Hilda Wise (6N1)130

        Revel Custis III (6Q) born 1778 died 1843 married:
   
         1st. 20 Dec 1784 to Sarah Custis (6Q1)131
   
         2nd. 23 Jan 1795132 to Margaret Smart Stringer (6Q2) died 28 Aug 1817 daughter of Thomas Stringer and Ann Unknown133

        Margaret Custis (6R) married: Margaret is buried on the Only farm134
   
         1st. to Francis Ounley (6R1) born 1793 died 1832135
   
         2nd. to "John" Ewell (6R2)136
   
         3rd. to Middleton Mason (6R3) son of Eleanor and William Mason (sold land in 1843)137.

Last Will and Testament of Francis Ounley
Accomac County, Virginia 1832

I Frances Ounley of the county of Accomack and State of Virginia do make this my Last Will and Testament in the manner and form following to wit:

1st. It is my desire that my just debts and funeral expenses be paid out of my personal estate.

2. I leave my land and the balance of my personal estate after payment of my debts to my wife Margaret during her life and at her death I leave said land and personal estate in the following manner.

I give to Henry Custis two hundred dollars and to James and Henry Custis sons of said Henry fifty dollars each.

I give to George Custis my wife’s brother one hundred dollars and I leave it to my said wife’s option to pay him any part or the whole of said sum during her life.

I give to Randall C. Revell two hundred dollars.

I leave to my wife Margaret the disposal of one half of my estate real and personal, after the payment of my debts and the above mentioned legacies, and the other half at her death I give to Ester Tumer wife of George Tumer and Joseph Taylor, Nancy Taylor and Ruth Taylor children of the said Esther by her former husband James Taylor, and to Peggy Turlington the widow of Authur Turlington and her children to wit:
Anne, Betsy, William, Authur and Sittleton Turlington to be equally divided among them.

And lastly I do hereby constitute and appoint my wife Margaret and my friend John Bayly as my executrix and executor of this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all others by me heretofore made. In testimony whereof I have hereto set my hand and affixed my seal this the 20th of October 1832.

Signed sealed and Pronounced by Francis Onley in our presence to be his last will and testament.

John Finny
L.S. Snead                                                                                                                                      Francis Ounley (seal)
William Carr..

In a court held for Accomack County on the 26th day of November 1832. The Last Will and Testament of Francis Ounley, deceased was proved by the oath of John Finney and Lewis S. Snead witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded and Margaret Ounley and John Bayly as the executrix and executor therein named having refused to qualify as such on the motion of the said John Bayly and Lewis S. Snead taking oath and giving bond according to law in the penalty of $10.00 with … do not have the remaining page.

Notes: This document establishes a two-hundred dollar legacy due Randall C. Revell from Francis Ounley. No mention is made as to why the legacy was created. Later Randall sells this legacy to Lewis Snead for $100.00 and uses that money to post bond with the Governor of Virginia in order to marry Virginia Laylor of Accomack County in Norfolk County.

Children of Rachael Revell Leatherbury (5BQ) and Thomas Leatherbury138 (5BQ1)
        Charles Leatherbury (6S) born 1743 died 26 Oct 1790 married 28 Feb 1764 to Sarah Smith (6S1)
        Thomas Leatherbury (6T) born 1743
        John Leatherbury (6U)
        Elizabeth "Sallie" Leatherbury (6V) born 1747

Children of John Revell (5BR) and Leah Corbin Revell (5BR1)
   
     Captain139 Edward Revell (6AA) born 1756140 died Dec 1791141 married:
   
         1st. Ann Ker142 (6AA1) born 1762 died 10 Apr 1788143 daughter of Edward Ker II144 and Margaret Shepard
   
         2nd. Susannah Andrews (6AA2) daughter of William Andrews and Anna Marie Hall died 1806145. After 
                    Edward's death Susannah146 married Revell West147 son of Anthony West and Eleanor Revell.

         William Revell (6AB) born 1758 died 1784 intestate148. William did not marry.

         John Revell (6AC)149 born 1760150 died 1806151 married 28 Feb 1787152 to Elizabeth Poulson (6AC1)153 died ca. 26 May 1817154
              daughter of Edmund Poulson and Ann Unknown.

        Sarah Revell (6AD) born 1762 married Unknown Poulson (6AD1).  Alive in Jul 1778155.  Leah's LW&T 
             dated 21 June 1796 names Sarah as still alive.

John Revell was born ca. 1710 and died intestate about 26 Jun 1764. He married Leah Corbin, daughter of Robert and Anne Corbin. After John's death Leah married William Seymour born 1737 died 1776. Son of Digby Seymour and Rosie Powell.

John inherited his father (Edwards’s) land, water mill, etc. after his mother’s death his sisters inherited personal property of their parents. All of this property except for two acres was passed to his son Edward at John's death in 1764. A survey at the division of this land in 1803 indicated that John Revell still owned two acres of this land. Children:
   
     Captain Edward Revell born 1756 died 1791 married 1st. Ann Kerr & 2nd. Susannah Andrews
   
     William Revell born 1758 died 1784 intestate
   
     Gunners Mate John Revell born 1760 married Elizabeth Poulson
   
     Sarah Revell born 1762 married Unknown Poulson

Children of Leah Corbin Revell (5BR1) and William Seymour (5BR1A)
        George Seymour (6AE)
        Elizabeth Seymour (6AF) married Unknown Ker (6AF1)
        Rose Seymour (6AG)
   
   William Seymour (Rev) (6AH) born 1 Oct 1773 died 21 Oct 1821156 married Elizabeth Revell Corbin Ker (6AH1)157 
            born 8 Jun 1771 died 1817 daughter of John Shepherd Ker and Agnes Drummond Corbin.
   
   Leah Seymour (6AJ)

Last Will and Testament of Leah Seymour 1796
Relic of John Revell

In the name of God, Amen. I Leah Seymour being weak in body but perfect memory do make this my Last Will and Testament to wit:

Item: It is my will and desire that that after my death my estate shall be sold of all the best advantage and that the money arising therefrom go towards paying my just debts.

Item: It is my will and desire that my children, namely John Revell, Sarah Poulson, the heirs of Edward Revell, George Seymour and the daughter of Elizabeth Ker have no part of my estate whatsoever.

Item: It is my will and desire that my son William Seymour and Leah Seymour divide equally between them two halves of the whole of my estate in every respect after my just debts as is mentioned above be discharged.

It is my will and desire that my son John Revell and my son William Seymour act as Executor to this my Last Will and testament. Witnessing hand and seal this 28th day of June in the year of Our Lord 1796.

Sealed and acknowledged in the presence of:

John Teakel
John Arlington                                                                                 Leah Seymour (seal)
Hutchinson Kellam

Source: Clerk of Court, Accomac County, Virginia Book of Wills 1794-1986 Page 405

Children of Agnes Revell Horsey (5BS) and Stephen Horsey IV (5BL)
        Isaac Horsey (6AM) alive 7 Nov 1756
        Elizabeth Revell Horsey (6AN) born 1753 born 1753 died 25 Sep 1775 married Col. George Corbin (6AN1) born 
            1744 died 28 Sep 1793158 in Accomac son of Col. Coventon Corbin and Barbaray Drummond159.

Seventh Generation:

Children of Captain160 Edward Revell (6AA) and Ann Ker Revell161 (6AA1) born 1762 died 10 Apr 1788.
   
     Captain162 John Ker Revell (7A) born ca. 1784163 died 1812 married 28 Feb 1805164 to Elizabeth S. Robins (7A1) 
                born ca. 1782 daughter of Daniel Gore Robins165 and Comfort Stockley.
   
     Margaret S. Revell (7B) born 1783 married 5 Dec 1810 to Samuel Ross (7B1)
   
     Leah Revell (7C) born ca. 1784 died 23 Aug 1793166.

Children of Captain Edward Revell (6M) and Susanna Andrews Revell (6M2)
   
     Captain167 Edward A. Revell168 (7D) born ca.1793 married 30 Nov 1814 169 to Catherine Coleburn (7D1) 
              died 21 Feb 1837170 daughter of Thomas A. and Mary A. Coleburn.

Edward A. Revell son of Edward Revell and Susanna Andrews Revell was orphaned by his father and assigned to Thomas Parker, a family friend, as Guardian, 11 September 1807. At that time Edward was still attending school as the court records show the itemized purchase of books and payment of tuition.

Source: Accomac County, Orphans Accounts 1800-1818 Pages 464-466.

Mrs. Ann Revell consort of Edward Revell and third daughter of Edward Ker Esq. Of Accomack County, died on 10 Apr 1788. A long obituary appeared in on 23 Apr 1788. Source: 18th Century Newspapers (NPJ 23 Apr 1788).

After Ann's death Edward married Susannah Andrews, daughter of William Andrews and Anna Marie Hall. When Edward died Susannah married Revell West, son of Anthony West and Eleanor Revell.

Children of Susannah Andrews Revell and Edward Revell:
   
     Edward A. Revell

John K., Margaret S. and Leah (deceased) were children of Edward's first wife, Ann Ker. The two surviving children and Edward A. inherited their father Edward's land in a survey for division in 1803. At that time the plantation was 1685 acres. Their father Edward inherited the land from his father (John) in 1770.

Sources: Virginia’s Eastern Shore by Ken Whitlaw, Volume II, Page 802.

August 4, 5 & 6th 1803. Attended the Sheriff of Accomac County aforesaid the jury by him impounded to make partition of the lands, whereof Edward Revell, late deceased died seize at Pungoteaque, in the County aforesaid, and surveyed the same containing one thousand six hundred and eighty-five acres on the 3rd day of August in the year aforesaid, in conformity with the directions of the inquisition of the jury and the assignment of the said Sheriff run the division lines prescribed, so as to made portions of the said land between the heirs of the said Edward Revell deceased according to the said inquisition, all which will more particularly appear by the annexed plat of the said premises and division lines.

                                John Ker Revell         625 acres
                                Margaret K. Revell   560 acres
                                Edward A. Revell      500 acres

Notes:

1. Mrs. Susannah Revell received payment from Administrators in 1792. According to Page 594 of Abstracts of Wills & Administrations of Accomack County in Virginia Susannah later married Revell West and she died in Sep 1806. She had a son Edmond Revell. This would undoubtedly be Edward A. Revell.  Source: 1804-1804 W&C Page 678

2. Mrs. Susannah Revell received 22.9 pounds from John Ker Revell administrator of Edward's estate on 18 Oct 1793. There was an order to Audit issued by the courts dated 25 Mar 1822. Source: 1821-1823 W&C page 173.

3. Susannah West's LW&T proved on 30 Sep 1806 names her four children as: Edmond Revell, John Rowles West, Anameriah West, and Revell West. At this time Edmond Revell is still not of legal age.171  Susannah West, the wife of Revell West died 30 Jul 1804.

4. On the motion of Susanna West taking the oath and giving bond with Zorobabel Kellum and Robert Andrews for security as the law requires Certificate is granted for obtaining Letters of Administration on the estate of Revell West. Source: Orders 1800-1804 Page 361

5. Susanna Revell (Plaintiff) vs Leah Seymour (Defendant) In Dower

It appearing to the Court that the Plaintiff in this suit hath married since the last continuance of this action--therefore the suit abates. Source: Orders 1789-1797 Page 340

5. An account of Susanna Revell in account with the Administrator of Edward Revell, deceased was returned and ordered to be recorded and on receipt the back of said account from Susanna Revell to John Shepherd Ker with Walter Jamison who is now dead, a witness thereto was proved to the satisfaction of the Court by the oath of Isaac Smith, who makes oath that he is well acquainted with the handwriting of the said Walter Jamison who is now dead and that his signature as a witness is as he openly believes is his handwriting and thereupon the said receipt is considered by the Court as sufficiently proved and the same is admitted to the record. Source: Orders 1819-1821 Pages 502 & 503

Children of John Revell (6AC)172 and Elizabeth Poulson Revell (6AC1) will dated 1806173
   
Captain174 William Revell (7G)175 born ca. 1789 married 14 Dec 1813 Sarah Fosque (7G1)176 Still alive in 1834.
   
George Corbin Revell (7J)177 born ca. 1791178 died 1817179, 17 Sep 1811180 married Elizabeth M. Fosque181 (7J1) born 1792 died 20 Jan 
           1854182.
   
Captain183 John Bagwell184 Revell (7K)185 born 23 May 1795 died 29 Mar 1835186 married:
   
         1st. 18 Sep 1816 Rosie D. Seymour187 (7K1) daughter of George Seymour188 and Margaret Hamel189.
   
         2nd. 9 Sep 1820190 Ann Wainhouse Hopkins (7K2) died 26 Jun 1854191 daughter of Maxamilian Hopkins and Elizabeth Armistead192.
    James K. Revell (7L)
born ca. 1797193 still alive in 1834194
    Edward Coleburn195 Revell (7M) born 1798196 died 1832 without issue197.
    Elizabeth Rebecca Revell (7N) born 16 Mar 1802198 died 3 Nov 1837 married 21 Feb 1824199 to Thomas H. Guy (7N1) born 
            21 Sep 1795 died 1 Jun 1828 son of John Guy Jr. and Elizabeth James.
   
Sarah "Sally B." Revell (7P) born 1805 married 7 Jun 1843 to James B. Poulson (7P1)200 born 24 Aug 1803 died 12 Jun 1859201
            son of James Poulson and Elizabeth James widow of John Guy Jr.  James B. Poulson had married first 20 May 1829 to 
            Elizabeth P. Williams born 29 Jan 1811 died 13 Oct 1836.

Last Will and Testament of John Revell, Sr.
26 November 1806

In the name of God, Amen. I John Revell, Sr. being in my proper senses do make this my last will and testament. Imprimis: I will and direct that the land I bought of John Smith containing 100 acres more or less be sold by my Executors or such of them as are qualified at public or private sale and upon such credit as my said Executors may think proper and that the proceeds of such sale be applied in the hands of my Executors for the payment of my just debts.

Item: I give and bequeath unto my son George Corbin Revell the lands I now live which I purchased from James Bonewell and Tully R. Wise containing two hundred and seventy acres more or less to him and his heirs forever, subject however, to the interest of my wife, Elizabeth, therein, which I give to her by this will and if my said son George die before he reach the age of twenty-one years or if he die after marriage without will and without issue living at the time of his death and in the lifetime of my son William, I will and desire that the aforesaid two hundred and seventy acres of land with appurtenances do go to my son William and his heirs forever.

Item: I give and devise unto my son John B. Revell the land I bought of the Executor of George Poulson deceased, and containing by survey sixty acres more or less, to him and his heirs forever in lieu of his share of the estate of Mrs. Catherine Scott deceased, devised to him and my other children by her and upon condition that he or those who claim under him never do claim any part of Catherine Scott's estate.

Item: I give to my wife Elizabeth Revell the use of the land and plantation whereon I now live and which I have before given to George Corbin, to her until my son George Corbin Revell arrives at the age of twenty-one years provided my said wife continues so long my widow and at the arrival of my said son to the age aforesaid. I give to my said wife during the remainder of her widowhood that part of the aforesaid lands which I purchased from James Bonewell meaning this provision in lieu of my said wife’s dower in all my lands.

Item: I give and bequeath to my son William in lieu of horses of his, which I have taken and applied to my use, my young horse called "Eclypse" and I desire the said colt or young horse shall be supported until he is four years old by my estate, in the possession of my wife.

Item: I give to my wife Elizabeth my mare called "Omega" and my resting chair forever.

Item: It is my wish and desire that my wife and Executors, who qualify, bind out my children on their arrival at proper ages to such trades and in such situations as they deem most advantageous, hereby giving them full power and authority to do whatever may be needful or necessary therein.

Item: Being engaged with Revell Twiford in a lease of five years of the lands on Deep Creek belonging to the heirs of Revell West, it is my will and desire having now got the lands underway to be cultivated to advantage and provided with the necessities, therefor that my Executors should continue to have the land cultivated and managed for the use and benefit of my estate until the expiration of the lease aforesaid. If Revell Twiford should live so long but in case of said Revell Twiford's death before the expiration of the lease, my will is that the lands aforesaid be rented out for the material benefit of the estates of said Revell Twiford and my own.

Item: I give to my executors full power and authority to make sales for the benefit of my representatives of any of my slaves, who my misbehave so as to induce my Executors to think for the advantage of those concerned in them that they should be sold.

Item: It is my will that my children should have the best education that circumstances will permit of wishing my wife and executors to use their discretion on what they feel will be most advantageous to my children.

Item: I give and bequeath the whole of the remainder of my personal estate after payment of my just debts to be divided between my sons William, James and Edward and my daughters Elizabeth and Sally so that Sally have a share equal to the shares of either of the other four children and in my personal estate and either of their shares in the sale of the land of Mrs. Catherine Scott devised to them, each of my five children to take their respectful shares of said personal estate as they arrive respectively at twenty-one years of age. Leaving, however, to my wife 1/3 thereof during her life and the different shares of my said children to remain with my wife until said children arrive respectively at age twenty-one and if either of my said five children should die before they arrive at that age the share of said children to go to the remaining survivors of them. My will is that such parts only of my personal estate as my wife may direct shall be sold for payment of my debts and that the residue thereof remain with her for her and my children's necessary support and maintenance agreeably to the last mentioned item of the will.

Lastly, I nominate and appoint my friend James Poulson, George Parker and my beloved wife Elizabeth Executors and Executrix of this my last will and testament.

In Testimony whereof I have hereto sit my hand and seal this the 26 November 1806.

                                                                                                                                            John Revell, Sr. seal
John Parker
Revell Sherwood
William Custis

I John Revell Senior do annex this as a codicil to my last will and testament. I will and direct that my lot of land in the town of Onancock joining the lands of William Layford be sold by my Executor's and in same manner and for same purposes as is directed in my will that the land I purchased of John Smith. In Testimony whereof I have hereto sit my hand and seal this the 4 day of December 1806.

                                                                                                                                            John Revell, Sr. seal

Signed in presence of:
Peggy West
William Custis
Henry Custis

Probated 28 Apr 1807

Source: Accomac County, Virginia Clerk of the Court Book of Wills 1806 –1809. Page 127 through Page 129

These lands are part of the same lands reported in Whitelaw's Eastern Shore of Virginia as A74 and A75.

On November 28, 1782, a little more than a year after the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown on October 19, 1781, a Marylander named Commodore Zedekiah Whaley put into Onancock seeking local support against the tory ships that were still marauding up and down the Chesapeake Bay. Several of these marauders had been sighted at the entrance of Onancock Creek. Colonel John Cropper and 25 of his men from the Accomack Militia volunteered to lend a hand, and they set sail from Onancock on board Whaley's fleet of barges. On November 30, 1782, the enemy was sighted and the small fleet begain to close. The resulting battle referred to as "Battle of the Barges" took place in Dedge's Straits just above Smith Island in Maryland. At the first sign of battle all the American barges fled except Whaley's. "Protector," which there upon bore the brunt of the battle. When an ammunition chest aboard the "Protector" exploded, members of the crew who were not killed outright were thrown overboard. or jumped into the water with clothes ablaze. The British easily had the better of the engagement, and among those who died was Commodore Whaley, Colonel Cropper, though defeated, arranged an exchange of prisoners, and the Americans put back into to Anechoic with 25 drowned or killed, 29 wounded, and only 11 unscathed. The following report issued by Colonel John Cropper to his superior officer Colonel William Davis and Major J. Poulson appears in the Calendar of State Papers Pages 390-392 and is repeated in Virginia's Eastern Shore by Ralth T. Whitelaw on Pages 923-925.

"Battle of the Barges"

Dear Sir:

On the 28 November. I received a letter from Commodore Wally, requesting a number of Militia to full man his fleet, in consequence of his intention to attack the enemy's barges then off Onancock. In compliance with which request, on the 29th, I went on board his fleet myself with twenty-five volunteers of the Accomack Militia. On the 30th at the head of Cagey's Straits we fell in with and engaged the enemy. When we approached them, within about 300 hundred yards, and the fire began to be serious, our barges all ran away except the Commodore's (the Protector) in which was Major Smith Snead, Captain Thomas Parker, Captain William Snead, myself and five other volunteers. This dastardly conduct of our comrades, brought on our barge the whole fire of the enemy, which was very severe, and it was as severely answered by the Protector, until the enemy's six barges were within fifty yards, when most unfortunately, the cartridges of our short eighteen-pounders caught fire amidships; the explosion of which burned three or four people to death, caused five or six more all afire to leap overboard, and the alarm of the barge blowing up made several others swim for their lives. The enemy, almost determined to retreat from our fire, as they told us afterwards, took new spirit at this disaster, and pushed up with redoubled fury. On the other hand our people opposed them with the most daring resolutions, there was one continual shower of musket balls, boarding pikes, cutlasses, cold shot and iron stantials for eight or ten minutes, till greatly overpowered by numbers, and having all the officers killed and wounded, we struck to them, after having wounded several their Commodore killed one Captain, wounded another and killed and wounded several of their inferior officers, and killed or wounded fifteen of the Kidnapper's crew, the barge that first boarded us. Commodore Wally was shot down, a little before the enemy boarded, acting the part of a cool and gallant officer. Captain Joseph Handy fell nigh the same time nobly fighting with one arm, after the loss of the other. Captain Levin Handy was badly wounded. There went into action in the Protector, sixty-five men; of which twenty-five of them were killed and drowned, twenty-nine were wounded, some of which are since dead, and eleven only escaped being wounded, most of which had leaped into the water to save themselves from the explosion. At the foot you have a particular account of the loss sustained by the volunteers on board the Protector.

After the surrender, I entered into an agreement with Commodore Kidd, to take ashore such of his wounded as chose to go, and to have them nursed and attended at Public expense, upon condition that he would parole all our prisoners as well the unhurt as the wounded, which agreement I hope will meet the approbation of his Excellency in council, and the Assembly. Being very much disordered with my wounds, I am scarcely able to write, therefore I beg leave to subscribe myself.

                                                                                                    Your most respectful servant
   
                                                                                 John Cropper, Jr.

Major Smith Snead was wounded with a cutlass in the head, a boarding pike in the arm and a contusion of a cold sot on his body.

Mr. John Revell was wounded in the arm with a musket ball and in the head with a cutlass.

Captain Thomas Parker, Mr. William Gibb and Mr. Evans escaped being wounded by leaping overboard at the alarm of the barge blowing up.

Myself was wounded with a cutlass in the head, slightly by a pike on the face and thigh, slightly by a cutlass on the shoulder, and after the surrender was knocked down by a four-pounder rammer, the blow of which was unfortunately near the same place where the cutlass hit.

You will do me a most singular honor to excuse the sally I took in the barge, and have me exchanged as soon as possible.

                                                                                                                                    Yours affectionately ,
                                                                                                                                                John Cropper, Jr

The Battle of the Barges was fought in Dedge's Straits in the Maryland portion of the Chesapeake Bay on 30 Nov 1782. This battle has the distinction of being the last naval engagement of the Revolutionary War.

John Revell Gunners Mate. LBP "When the ship to which he was attached was in harbour he would join the troops on land." See N's Accomack, 23 and 24. The Roster of …

 Revolutionary War Records of Soldiers
Accomac County Virginia Pages 23.

It is ordered to be certified that it appears to the Court by satisfactory evidence that William Revell, John B. Revell, James A. Revell, Sally B. Revell, Elizabeth R. Guy and Nathaniel F., Catherine and Margaret Revell are the only heirs at law of John Revell deceased formerly a Gunners Mate in the Navy of the State of Virginia in the Revolutionary War. The said William, John B., James and Sally B. Revell and Elizabeth R. Guy being children of said John Revell and the said Nathaniel F., Catherine and Margaret, being the only children of the said George C. Revell another child of John Revell. 31 Jan 1831 Page 220.

Revolutionary War Records of Soldiers
Accomac County Virginia Pages 34

It is ordered to be certified that it appears to the Court by satisfactory evidence that Edward C. Revell, one of the children and devisees of John Revell, deceased who was formerly a Gunners Mate in the Virginia State Navy in the revolutionary War, has died intestate and without issue leaving as his next of kin and only heirs at law his brothers and sisters William Revell, John B. Revell, James Revell, Sally B. Revell and Elizabeth R. Guy, formerly Elizabeth R. Revell and one nephew Nathaniel F. Revell and two nieces, Catherine and Margaret Revell, the said Nathaniel F., Catherine and Margaret being the only children of George C. Revell deceased who was a brother of the said Edward C. Revell. 30 April 1832 Page 465.

John died 1806; his son Edward C. Revell died in 1791.

John's father John died intestate and his wife Leah Corbin Revell became administrix of her husband estate, which she maintained until her death in 1796. Leah made bequest to her children John, Sarah Poulson, the heirs of Edward Revell, the daughter of Elizabeth Kerr and to the Seymour children.

Mary Parker to John Revell September 1, 1790
Deed to Property at Onancock Creek

This indenture made this first day of September, anno Domini, one thousand seven hundred and ninety, between Mary Parker of the Parish of St. George and County of Accomac of the one part and John Revell of the same place of the other part witness that whereas James Bonewell, son of Mary, being indebted unto his sister the aforesaid Mary Parker in the term of two hundred pounds current money of Virginia and to secure the payment thereof with interest and Court of recording his mortgage did by his mortgage deed bearing date thirteenth day of April, anno Domini, one thousand seven hundred and eighty seven, duly recorded amongst the records of Accomac County Court, convey unto the aforesaid Mary Parker her heirs and assigns for ever, a certain Tract or Parcel of Land situate lying and being on Onancock Creek in the parish and county aforesaid containing by estimation one hundred and fifty acres of land be the same more or less, subject only to the dower of his mother the aforesaid Mary Bonewell and whereas the aforesaid James Bonewell and Mary his wife have by their deed of Bargain and Sale bearing the date the eighth day of September anno Domini, one thousand seven hundred and eighty nine convey unto the aforesaid John Revell for the consideration of three hundred and thirty seven pounds, ten shillings the free simple estate of and in the premises aforesaid, as by the last sealed deed duly recorded amongst the Records of the Court of the County aforesaid, reference thereof being had more at large will appear and whereas also the aforesaid John Revell hath paid unto the aforesaid Mary Parker the sum of two hundred and twenty three pounds and four pence current money of Virginia, the receipt whereby is hereby acknowledged in full satisfaction for the consideration expressed in the said James Bonewell's Mortgage Deed unto the aforesaid Mary Parker first above recited, now this indenture further witnesses that the said Mary Parker in consideration of the above recited monies hath granted, bargained, sold, and released and by these presents doth covenant, bargain, sell, and release unto the aforesaid John Revell his heirs and assigns for ever, all her Right Title and Interest of, in, and unto the above mentioned Lands and premises together with all and singular the appurtenances thereto belonging to have and to hold the aforesaid bargained, granted, sold, and released premises with all and singular appurtenances thereunto and belonging unto the said John Revell his heirs and assigns for ever, to and for the proper use, benefit and behoof of the said John Revell his heirs and assigns forever and no other use or purpose whatsoever.

In Testimony whereof the said Mary Parker hath hereunto set her hand and affixed her Seal, the day and year first above written.

Signed, Sealed and Delivered in presence of:

Thomas Evans                                                 Mary Parker     seal
George Corbin
Edmond Bayly Jr.

At a Court held in Accomac County, October 29, 1794 This Indenture was acknowledged by said Mary Parker as her act and Deed which is ordered to be recorded and an instrument signed by

    Teste
   
                         Littleton Savage

Source: Accomac County Deeds 1793 - 1797 Page 214; Parker to Revell

John Revell to George Corbin Revell
November 13, 1793

This indenture made this thirteenth day of November, anno Domini, one thousand seven hundred and ninety three, between John Revell of the County of Accomac of the one part and George Corbin Revell, son of the aforesaid John Revell of the other part, Witness that the aforesaid John Revell for and in consideration of the sum of Four hundred and seventy three pounds, sixteen shillings to him paid by George Corbin, deceased, late of the aforesaid county, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, and in consideration of the natural love and affection which he the said John Revell hath and doth bear unto his son the aforesaid George Corbin Revell, hath given, granted, bargained, sold, and by these presents doth give, grant, bargain, sell, alien, enforce and confirm unto the said George Corbin Revell, his heirs and assigns for ever, one certain plantation tenement and Tract of Land situate lying and being in the County of Accomac aforesaid on Onancock Creek containing by estimation one hundred and eighty five acres, be the same more or less, being the land and plantation formerly purchased by the same John Revell of a certain James Bonewell, reserving only to himself and his wife Elizabeth, a life estate in the premises that is to say during their joint lives and the life of the survivor, so have and to hold the hereby granted and bargained land and plantation together with the appurtenances unto the aforesaid George Corbin Revell, his heirs and assigns for ever, to the only proper use, benefit and behoof of the said George Corbin Revell, his heirs and assigns forever, (Subject nevertheless to the former exception and reservation) and to or for no other use intent or purpose whatsoever and the said John Revell doth hereby covenant and agree to and with his said son George Corbin Revell, his heirs and assigns for ever, to warrant and defer the hereby granted and bargained land and plantation together with the appurtenances (except as is before excepted) unto the aforesaid George Corbin Revell, his heirs and assigns for ever against the lawful claim title or interest of all and every person or persons claiming or to lay claim to the same or any part thereof from by or under him the said John Revell or his heirs. In testimony whereof the same John Revell hath set his hand and affixed his seal to these presents the day and year first above written.

                                                                                                                        John Revell seal
Sealed and Acknowledged in presence of:

John Rodgers
Anthony West
John S. Ker

Source: Accomac County Deeds 1793 -1797 Page 214 "Revell to Revell" Taken from the Virginia Archives in Richmond, Virginia 24 Aug 1990.

Thereby certify and acknowledge that George Corbin, deceased, late of the county of Accomac, did during his lifetime in his last illness give unto John Revell on certain conditions the sum of four hundred and seventy three pounds, sixteen shillings being the balance which the aforesaid John Revell owed to this George Corbin on account, is stated at large on the books of the said George Corbin and that he be caused the following entry to be made on his books; namely

            O             This balance is given to John Revell by George Corbin upon condition that he gives that place 
                            which he calls his Bonewell Plantation to his second son George and that he make the same 
                            over to his son in twelve months. Reserving his and his wife's life therein 21 September 1793.

Given under my hand this the twenty fifth day of November, 1793

                                            John Shepard Ker

At Court held in Accomac County, October 29, 1794

This Indenture was acknowledged by the said John Revell as his act and Deed which is ordered to be recorded and an Instrument signed by John S. Ker was also acknowledged by the said John S. Ker and ordered to be recorded.

    EXCUM                         Teste
   
                     Littletown Savage

John Revell had purchased land from James Bonewell at Accomac Creek in the county of Accomac on September 9, 1790 for 337 pounds, 10 shillings. During George Corbin's last illness he committed to forgive John Revell's debt of 473 pounds, 16 shillings if he gave the Bonewell Plantation to his second son George Corbin Revell within one year after the agreement was reached. John was allowed to claim a lifetime maintenance for he and his wife. These records trace those actions from John's original purchase to his passing the property over to his son George Corbin Revell and the final disposition of John Revell Sr.'s estate.

Children of Elizabeth Revell Horsey Corbin (6AN) and Col. George Corbin (6AN1)
   
     James Revell Corbin (7R) born 1771 died 22 Sep 1793202
   
     Agnes Drummond Corbin (7S) born Jan 1775 died Feb 1814203 married John Shepherd Ker (7S1)204 born 1768 died Sep 1806.

Children of Eleanor Revell West died 25 Apr 1804 will probated 25 Jun 1804 and Anthony West died 5 Feb 1795 proved 23 Feb 1795 6 Aug 1804 (Inventory)205
        Elizabeth "Ann" West born 1752 married John West, Sr.
        Revell West born 15 Mar 1755 died 26 Dec 1802 buried at Deep Creek married Susanna Andrews Widow of Edward Revell
            Administration to Susanna West Orders 1800-1804 Page 362
        John West born 1757 died 29 Jun 1799 proved 28 Jul 1800
        Elizabeth West born 1759 died 12 Mar 1811 will proved 27 Nov 1811
        Anthony West born 24 Aug 1760 died 2 Feb 1795 buried at Deep Creek206.
        George West born 1762 died 25 Mar 1795207
        Rachael West born 1764 married Revel Twiford in 1783
        Agnes West born 1768 married Henry Parker
        Margaret West born 1770
        Isaac West born 1772 died 29 Jan 1844208

Note: The Scott Hall Burying Ground is located in Old Port Scarburgh now known as the town of Onancock on the northern edge of lot #4 which was previously owned by James and Catherine Scott who also owned the adjacent lots 5, 6 & 7 that ran along next to the creek on the south side of Queen Street. The Scott family homestead called "Scott Hall" was close by and helps to explain how the cemetery acquired its name. George Corbin was a very good friend of James and Catherine Revell Scott. The tombstones inscribed there sadly record the hopes, dreams and promise of two generations of Corbins.

Here lies the remains of   In Memory of
ELIZABETH REVELL CORBIN GEORGE CORBIN, ESQ
Wife of George Corbin Whose integrity of conduct
Who died Sept 25, 1775 gentleness of manners and
Aged 22 In her were combined benevolence of heart were
The endearing qualitys of an  eminently conspicuous. He
admirable wife, sincere friend,  was a tender and indulgent parent
And humane mistress  an humane master
A generous landlord
A sincere friend.
In Memory of  His mourning relatives and
JAMES REVELL CORBIN  Connections have dedicated this
Who died Sept 22, 1793 Tomb. He died Sept 28, 1793
Aged 20 Aged 49
And whose remains are here interred
At a time when just entering on the  Here lies the remains of
Stage of life AGNES DRUMMOND CORBIN KER
Promising fun to gratify the wishes  daughter of George and Elizabeth Corbin
Of his friends in becoming a good and wife to John Shepard Ker
Man and useful member of society Who died Feb 1814; aged 39 years and
He was arrested in his youthful 1 month. To whose memory this stone
Career scarcely verging to manhood   is dedicated by her son Edward H. Ker
Here lies the remains of  Sacred to the memory of
JOHN SHEPARD KER, ESQ. Son of MARGARET ANN KER
Edward and Margaret Ker who died daughter of Richard and Sarah
September 1806 aged 38 years Bayly and wife to Edward H. Ker
To whose memory this stone is Who departed this life Nov 10,
Dedicated by his son Edward H. Ker 1821 aged 18 years 6 mo and 10 days.
Sacred to the memory of
EDWARD H. KER
Son of John Shepard and Agnes D. Ker
Who departed this life Jan 1820
Aged 29 years and 5 months.

  A big Thank You to Miss Sarah N.N. Parker who in 1930 copied the above inscriptions for posterity as the tombstone inscriptions are virtually unreadable today. Kerr Place distributes a copy of these inscriptions in a handout flyer prepared by the late Nora Miller Turman with whom I had the distinct honor and pleasure of working with when this odyssey began in the mid 1980s.

Eighth Generation:

Children of Captain John Ker Revell (7A) and Elizabeth "Betsy" Robbins Revell (7A1)
   
     Comfort Ann Revell (8A) born 1807 died 1832209.

30 Jan 1802. Thomas H. Bayly to the Governor

        In the county of Accomac a troop of Cavalry has lately been raised, under the command of Captain Revell. This troop, though very desirous to equip themselves, have not been able to accomplish it, and are now very deficient in swords, pistols, &c.

        I persuade myself that when the Executive view our situation, they will not neglect furnishing this troop of Cavalry completely.

        Our county is long and narrow, open to attack on every point, and our internal enemy are numerous on that shore, and would move rapidly. As we could expect no assistance from our fellow citizens on this shore in case of emergency, we ought to be favored with arms, for as et we have been neglected. When many of the towns in this State were armed by the late law, the Eastern Shore, requiring it more than many, were refused.

        I will thank you sir, to communicate the above to the Council of State, that they may in their wisdom do what is right.

                                                                                    I am, &c.

Source: Calendar of State Papers Page 277

                                                                                                                                            Adjutant General's Office
                                                                                                                                            Richmond, March 30th 1804

        By the 4th Sec. (section) of the Militia law, passed at the last session of the General Assembly, the Governor with the advise of Council, is authorized and required to arrange the Companies of Artillery into Regiments and Battalions in such a manner as to them may seem most convenient. It appears from the same section of the law that the troops of Cavalry were intended to be arranged into regiments and Squadrons, although it is not so clearly expressed as in the case of the Artillery. Under the former Militia law, the several companies of Artillery and troops of Cavalry in each division were formed into regiments respectively, and the number of division affixed to those regiments. It remains to arrange those companies of Artillery into Battalions, and if the Council should so determine the troops of Cavalry into Squadrons and the Majors respectively assigned to them.

        By the 11th Sec. "the Governor with the advise of Council, shall and may cause the several companies of Artillery, Cavalry, Grenadiers, Light Infantry and Riflemen to be allotted by entire companies into divisions from 1 to 10 for a regular routine duty."

        Under the Militia law passed in 1795, this was done, since which a Company of Artillery commanded by Thomas W. Cocke of Campbell in the first Regiment; also a company commanded by Robert Lewis of Caroline in the 2nd Regiment.

        And a company by James White, of Washington
   
         Do. by John Koontz, of Rockingham.
   
         Do. by David Long, of Harrison, in 3rd Reg't. has been organized

Also a troop of Cavalry commanded by Thomas W. Todd, of Nottoway.
    Do. By William Taylor, of Mecklenburg.
    Do. By William Walker, of Bedford.
    Do. By William Taylor, of Pittsylvania.
    Do. By
    Do. By
    Do. By John Revell of Accomack.
    Do. By
    Do. By

It remains to allot these companies and troops into routine divisions from 1 to 10.

        The Companies of Grenadiers, Light Infantry, and Riflemen belonging to the Battalions of the Regiments numbered from 1 to 102 have been allotted to their routine divisions from 1 to 10. Those belonging to the Battalions of the Regiments numbered from 103 to 104 remain to be so allotted.

        With a view to the arrangement of the companies of Artillery and troops of Cavalry into Battalions and Squadrons, I herewith enclose statements marked A and B, calculated to facilitate that arrangement.

        I have further to solicit the attention of your Excellency to the 22nd section of this law, by which the Executive are authorized and required, if the same shall not have been already done, to have a sufficient number of copies of the rules of discipline established by resolution of Congress of the 29th of March, 1779 printed and bound to boards to afford every commissioned officer of the militia one copy. Since a similar clause in the Militia law of 1792 was carried into effect, the number of militia officers has considerably increased. It is respectfully suggested whether it be not advisable to call for a return of these rules now in the hands of the officers from the commandants of the regiments that the deficiency may be ascertained, and when deemed expedient procured as directed.

                                                                                                    I am, &c.

                                                                                                                    Samuel Coleman
   
                                                                                     Deputy A. G.

Statement A (taken out of context)

Regiment

Captain John Ambler, James City,  2nd Brigade
Captain William Austin  Henrico,  2nd Brigade
Captain Benjamin Oliver Hanover, 2nd Brigade
Captain Burwell Bassett, New Kent, 2nd Brigade
Captain Archibald Ritchie, Essex,  14th Brigade
Captain Vincent Branham,  Richmond,  14th Brigade
Captain George W. Boothe, Gloucester, 14th Brigade
Captain Elias Edmunds,  Lancaster,  14th Brigade
Captain William Ball,  Northumberland, 14th Brigade
Captain Beverley Robinson, King William,  14th Brigade
Captain Thomas Plummer, Westmoreland, 14th Brigade
Captain Elliott Muse, Middlesex,  14th Brigade
Captain John Temple, King and Queen, 14th Brigade
Captain Canfield Seward, Surry, 8th Brigade
Captain James Riddick,  Nansemond, 8th Brigade
Captain John Baird, Jr.,  Prince George,  8th Brigade
Captain William Peters, Sussex, 8th Brigade
Captain Joshua Fort, Southampton,  8th Brigade
Captain Littleton W. Tazewell,  Norfolk,  9th Brigade
Captain John Eyre,  Northampton,  9th Brigade
Captain John Revell,  Accomack,  9th Brigade

Majors- Peter B. Whitng, Gloucester; Tunstall Banks, Essex.

Source: Calendar of State Papers Pages 404 through 408

LAST WILL AND TESTIMENT OF JOHN K. REVELL
16 MAY 1809

Son of Edward and Ann Kerr Revell

In the name of God Amen. I John K. Revell of the County of Accomac and State of Virginia being of sound mind and disposing memory do make and ordain this my last will and testament in manner and form as follows. Viz:

Imprumis. I will and direct that the lands deeded me by George Marshall adjoining the lands of William Welburne and others near Horntown and also the lands on Chincoteaque Island both of which formerly belonged to my wife, the lots purchased of the Executors of David Bowman and William B. Addison and wife with improvement thereon whereon I now reside and twenty-nine acres of wood land lying on the west side of the country road leading from Pungoteaque to Onancock being part of a tract that belonged to my deceased father, to be sold either at public or private sale by my Executor on the following terms to wit. One third of the purchase ensuing to be paid within six months from the day of sale, one third within twelve months and the remaining one third within five years. The payment of which is to be secured by bond with approved security with interest from the date of the sale until paid. And in case … the lots at Horntown and Chincoteaque Island, which I have left to be sold, may bring a better price.

I will and direct that of the said The land which my daughter Comfort Ann Revell hath fallen heir to by the death of her Aunt Joyce Robins also be sold by my Executor on the same … and conditions and in case my daughter should refuse then …

Item: I do hereby appoint my Executor to convey and make good a title to the lands I have sold

Item: I give and bequeath to my Executor, William Seymour and to his heirs forever one half of my water grist mill and stream in consideration of the trouble if any, in the settlement and management of my will.

Item: I give my wearing apparel to my brother, Edward and two cousins, William Revell and John B. Revell to be divided as mutually agreeable to them.

Item: I give to my sister Margaret and brother Edward cash for a suit of mourning.

Item; I give and bequeath to my daughter, Comfort Anne Revell and to her heirs forever all the remaining part of my personal and real estate; five hundred and ninety-four acres of land lying on the east side of the road leading from Pungoteaque to Onancock and my island known by the name as "Revell's Island". But in case my daughter should die before her arrival at lawful age without issue, I will and direct the real property herein given her be equally divided between my cousin, John B. Revell and Hugh G. Seymour and their heirs forever, and the personal estate herein given her in case of her death aforementioned, I give to my cousin, William Revell.

Item: My will and desire is that my uncle, William Seymour should take the guardianship of my daughter and the management of her estate.

Lastly: I nominate and appoint my uncle William Seymour, Executor to this my last will and testament hereby revoking and disannulling all other will or wills by me heretofore made. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this the 16th day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and nine.

Signed, sealed, Published, Pronounced                                                     John K. Revell         seal
And Acknowledged in presence of:

Zorobabel Kellam
William Christian
John M. Watson

In a court held for Accomac County the 26 day of February 1810
The foregoing last will and testament of John K. Revell deceased was proved by the oaths of William Christian and John M. Watson witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded. And on the motion of William Seymour, the Executor therein named taking oath and giving bond as the law requires in ten thousand dollars with Samuel Downing and James Poulson as securities. Certificate is granted him for obtaining … thereof …

                                                                                                        Teste
   
                                                                                            John
Examined

Source: Accomac County, Virginia Clerk of Court Will Book 1809-1812 Page 162 and 163

Deed of George Marshall to John Ker Revell

This deed made the Twenty-first day of May in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and seven between George Marshall of the Parish of St. George and County of Accomac of the one part and John K. Revell of Pungoteaque in the same Parish and County of the other part.

        Witnesseth that the said George Marshall for and in consideration of Five Hundred pounds current money of Virginia to him in hand paid by the said John K. Revell, at and before the ensealing and delivery hereof, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, hath granted, bargained, paid and by these presents doth grant, bargain and sell unto him the said John K. Revell and his heirs and his assigns forever one undivided moiety of three hundred acres of land lying on the head of Chincoteaque; a moiety, also undivided, moiety of eight hundred and eighty four acres of land and marsh on Chincoteaque Island and also an undefined moiety of fifty acres of marsh on Fidler Island being the whole of the lands and marshes which were conveyed by said John K. Revell and Betsey, his wife to the said George Marshall by their deed bearing the date the day before (the day of) their presents with the revisions and 

and all and singular the right, members, privileges and appurtenances to the same belonging or anywise appertaining. To have and to hold the said granted premises with appurtenances to him the said John K. Revell and his heirs and assigns forever and to and for no other use intents or purpose but the proper use and behoof of the said John K. Revell and his heirs and assigns and the said George Marshall doth hereby covenant and grant and agree

...lost the ending can be reestablished if needed. JRR

Source: Deed Book # 10 (1800 - 1804) and #11 (1804 - 1807) Page Number 883 Marshall to Revell

Deed of John Custis to John Ker Revell
1805

This deed made this the Twenty first day of June One Thousand eight hundred and five between John Custis (Bayside) on the one part and John Revell ...... on the other part both of the county of Accomack in Virginia.

Witnesseth: that the said John Custis for and in consideration of the sum of two hundred and seventy three pounds five shillings current money of Virginia to him in hand paid by said John Revell the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged hath given granted bargained sold and delivered and by these presents doth give grant bargain sell and deliver unto the said John Revell his heirs and assigns forever all the right title and interest which he the said John Custis hath by virtue of a deed bearing the date of the twenty third day of February one thousand eight hundred and five from William Seymour the Executor and Ann (West, daughter of John West) Poulson the widow of George Poulson dec. in and to a certain tract of land situate lying and being in the County of Accomack near to Deep Creek mill, bounded by the lands of the said John Revell ...... purchased from John Smith, on the southwest by the lands of John S. Henry, on the southeast by the lands of John West ( and is a ) on the northeast and by the lands of George Poulson dec. on the ..................lost the ending.

Source: Deed Book # 10 (1800 - 1804) and #11 (1804 - 1807)

Deed of David Bowman, Estate to John Ker Revell
1805

This deed made this the Twenty-sixth day of December, one thousand eight hundred and five, between John S. Ker and William Seymour, Executors of David Bowman and Isabelle Bowman widow of said David, all of the County of Accomack and state of Virginia on the one part, and John K. Revell of the County of Accomack on the other part.

        WITNESSETH: that whereas the aforementioned David Bowman did by his last will and testament of record in the County Court of Accomack among things in said will contained, direct that his Executors should in their discretion make sale of the lands bought by said D. Bowman of William Baddipan together with the improvements thereon, upon a credit, log three equal annual installments to carry interest from the day of sale: and his said Executors John S. Ker and William Seymour having this day made sale of the lands and improvements thereto at public sale and the aforesaid John K. Revell being the highest bidder at the sum of Eight hundred and Fifty pounds current money of Virginia. Now this deed further witnesses that the said John S. Ker and William Seymour and Isabelle Bowman for and in consideration of the aforesaid sum of Eight Hundred and Fifty pounds specie current money, to them secured agreeable to the terms by the auction and directed to be paid by the aforesaid John K. Revell, having granted, bargained and sold to the aforesaid John K. Revell and by these presents do give grant bargain and sell unto the aforesaid John K. Revell his heirs and assigns forever all the right, title and interest of the said David Bowman in a certain tract of parcel of land containing by survey eight and five perches, be the same more or less together with all and singular the right privileges and appurtenances whatsoever, and bounding Northerly, by the lands of William Baddipon, Southerly by the road leading to Pungoteaque Warehouse and Westerly by the lands of William Baddipon called the Warehouse lots, and by an arm of Pungoteaque Creek. To have and to hold the hereby bargained and sold premises as aforementioned with all and singular the rights, members, privileges and appurtenances thereto belonging or in anywise appertaining unto him the aforesaid John K. Revell his heirs and assigns forever to the only benefit and behoof of the said John K. Revell his heirs and assigns forever and to or for no other use intent or purpose whatsoever.

In testimony whereof the parties above named have hereunto sat their hands and affixed their seals this day and year first above written.

Signed, Sealed and delivered                                                                 John Shepard Ker         Seal
in presence of..

        William Seymour Seal
        Isabelle Bowman Seal

Gilbert M. Leatherbury
Jepo Ames
John Bull

At a Court held for Accomack County, December the 30th, 1805. This deed from John S. Ker and William Seymour, Executors of David Bowman, dec. to John K. Revell was acknowledged by the said John S. Ker and William Seymour as their act and deed and was sworn asto said Isabelle, as by the oath of Gilbert M. Leatherbury, Jepo Ames and John Bull Sew witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded.

        Teste:     John Wise Cobb

Source: Deed Book # IV 1800 - 1805 Page 442 and 443

Deed of John Ker Revell to David Bowman, Estate
1805

This deed made this the Twenty-seventh day of December, one thousand eight hundred and five, between John K. Revell on the one part and John S. Ker and William Seymour, Executors of David Bowman on the other part, all of the County of Accomack in Virginia.

            WITNESSETH: that the said John K. Revell in order to secure the payment of the sum of Eight Hundred and Fifty Pounds current money of Virginia with interest from the twenty-sixth day of this month which the said John K. Revell stands justly indebted to the said John S. Ker and William Seymour, Executors of David Bowman, and being the sum upon which the land with improvements auctioned to be sold by said D. Bowman sold for, and in consideration of the sum of five shillings current money of Virginia to him the said John K. Revell in hand paid by the aforesaid John S. Ker and William Seymour at and before the ensealing and delivery of these presents the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged he the aforesaid John K. Revell hath given granted bargained and sold and by these presents doth give grant bargain and sell unto the said Ker and Seymour their heirs and assigns forever a certain tract of parcel of land situate lying and being in the County of Accomack and bounded Northerly by the lands of William Read, a branch dividing it from said Read, Easterly by the lands of John Rodgers, William Caitite, and John Forgree, Southerly by the Mill Pond, and Westerly by the lands of Edward and Margaret Revell containing six hundred and twenty five acres more or less with all and singular the rights privileges and appurtenances thereto belonging or in anywise appertaining to have and to hold the hereby bargained and sold six hundred and twenty five acres more or less with all and singular the rights privileges and appurtenances thereto belonging or in anywise appertaining unto them the said John S. Ker and William Seymour, their heirs and assigns forever, to the only benefit and behoof of said Ker and Seymour their heirs and assigns forever and to or for no other use intent or purpose whatsoever provided nevertheless, and it is the true intent and meaning of this deed that if the aforesaid John K. Revell his heirs Executors or Administrators shall, will, and truly pay unto the aforesaid John S. Ker and William Seymour Executors of David Bowman, dec. their heirs, Executors, Administrators, or assigns, the full and just sum of Eight Hundred and Fifty Pounds current money of Virginia in three equal annual installments with interest thereon from the 26th day of this month, that is the sum of Two Hundred and Eighty-Three pounds, six shillings and eight pence specie current money of Virginia on or before the Twenty-sixth day of December, one thousand eight hundred and six, and the like sum of Two Hundred and Eighty-Three pounds, six shillings and eight pence current money of Virginia on or before the Twenty-sixth day of December, one thousand eight hundred and seven and the sum of two hundred and eighty three pounds, six shillings and eight pence on or before the Twenty sixth day of December One thousand eight hundred and eight with legal interest on all of these several sums from the Twenty sixth day of the month and shall also pay and satisfy all costs of every kind that may accrue by reason of this present deed then the lands hereby conveyed to revest to and revest in the said John K. Revell his heirs and assigns as completely as if this deed had never been executed, but should the said John K. Revell his heirs Executors and administrators fail to pay the money aforesaid in the manner as at the times above mentioned with interest and costs to them it shall be lawful for said John S. Ker and William Seymour their heirs Executors, Administrators, or assigns to make sale of the lands hereby conveyed and to pay and satisfy this aforesaid sum of money with interest and all costs anything to the county herein contained notwithstanding and the said John K. Revell doth hereby covenant, agree, promise, and bind himself, his heirs, Executors and Administrators to and with said John S. Ker and William Seymour their heirs, Executors and Administrators and assigns that he the said John K. Revell, his heirs, Executors or administrators will and surely pay the aforesaid sums of money at the times and in the manner aforesaid with interest and costs as aforesaid.

            In testimony whereof the said John K. Revell hath hereunto sat his hand and affixed his seal the day and year first above written.

Signed Sealed and Delivered             John Ker Revell Seal

In presence of:

Gilbert M. Leatherbury
Jepo Ames
John Bull

At a Court held for Accomack County, December the 30th, 1805. This deed from John K. Revell to John S. Ker and William Seymour, Executors of David Bowman, dec. was acknowledged by the said John K. Revell as his act and deed and ordered to be recorded. Teste: John Wise Cobb

Source: Clerk of Court Accomac County, Virginia, Deed Book # IV 1800 - 1805 Page 444 and 445

This day came the parties by their attorneys and this cause was argued by council and it appearing to the Court that all proper parties are not before the Court, it is ordered that the Plaintiff cause subpoena to be issued making the Executors of William Seymour, deceased and the Administrators of John K. Revell, deceased parties defendant in this cause. And on the motion of Edward S. Snead, Executor of David Bowman, deceased, he is permitted to file Crop Bill against the Plaintiff and against the defendants John B. Revell and Hugh H. Seymour as devisees of John K. Revell, deceased. And upon motion of John B. Revell and Hugh H. Seymour they are permitted to file a Crop Boll against the Executor of said David Bowman, deceased and the Administrator of Sallie Bowman, deceased and ordered that this cause be continued.

Source: Orders 1829-1832 Page 318 Comfort Ann Revell (Plaintiff) vs. Edward A. Revell (Defendant)

On the motion of Edward S. Snead, Executor of David Bowman, deceased, it is ordered that the estate of John K. Revell be committed to the Sheriff for Administration. On the motion of John B. Revell, Hugh Seymour. 29 Jun 1831.

Source: Orders 1829-1832 Page 317

Notes: John Ker Revell was in process of settling a land transaction from the estate of David Bowman, deceased when he died in 1808. Before his administrators could complete all legal matters, the administrator (William Seymour) also died. Then the wife of David Bowman died and the situation became very complex and continued until 1831.

Children of Edward A. (7D) and Catherine Colburn Revell (7D1)
   
     John Thomas Revell210 (8B) born 1820 died 6 Mar 1821211
   
     Thomas Colburn Revell212 (8J) born 1823

Edward A. Revell married 30 Nov 1814213 to Catherine Coleburn died 21 Feb 1837214 daughter of Thomas A. and Mary A. Coleburn.

John Thomas Revell born 5 Mar 1820 died 6 Mar 1821. The funeral was held at St. George's Parish.

Thomas Colburn Revell born Mar 16, 1823

Source:     St. George's Parish Register 1819-1899 taken from the State Archives.
   
           Personal letter from Rector Tucker dated 25 May 1984 as corrected.

Edward and Catherine sold 6 acres of land their land in 1819 to William Perry Moore.

Located off the old Bayside Stagecoach Road, built around 1710 Vaux Hall has been owned by only four families. The Revell's, The Moore's, the Nock's and now the … In the late 1790s and early 1800s a considerable portion of the Revell farm acreage was contained in a peach orchard. There is an unverified tradition concerning Vaux Hall that is somewhat authenticated by the beautiful Chippendale mirror that hung in the parlor during the ownership of the Nock family. The last Revell (Edward A.) was a compulsive gambler and often played cards with his friends. During one such game that lasted over ten nights in which Edward was a heavy loser. William Moore discovered that he could read the cards held in Edward's hand by looking into the mirror, which then was hung to the side of the fireplace. Cagily he would lose a little each night but win more. After Edward's money ran out he started betting a row of peach trees at a time. The peach orchard went row by row, until eventually all of the property, its furnishings, and even his riding horse was lost. When the property was sold in 1905 to the Nock's Moore's granddaughter Mrs. King said that "the mirror about which she had heard all of her life was to go with the property."

Source: Garden Weekly Supplement published by the Eastern Shore News Apr 1978;

Major Edward A. Revell transferred a license to operate a Tavern to George C. Waters.  Source: Orders 1837.

Edward A. Revell vs Comfort Anne Revell (niece and daughter of John Kerr Revell).  Source: Orders 27 Mar 1838.

Children of William (7G) and Sarah Fosque Revell (7G1)
   
     Randall C. Revell (8D) born 28 Oct 1813 in Accomac County, Virginia died on 2 Feb 1849 married to Virginia Laylor 
                daughter of Arthur and Elizabeth Laylor born 15 Dec 1814 in Accomac County, Virginia died 23 Nov 1865. Both 
                Randall and Virginia are buried in Cedar Grove Cemetery in Portsmouth, Virginia.

Children of George Corbin Revell (7J) and Elizabeth N. (Fosque) Revell (7J1)
   
         Nathaniel F. Revell (8E) married 25 Mar 1839215 Elizabeth Colbourn (8E1)
   
          Catherine Corbin Revell (8F) born 15 Jan 1813 died 15 Dec 1892216 married 14 Nov 1835217 to John R. Watson (8F1)
                         born 20 Mar 1810 died 18 Jul 1868218 son of John Watson born 22 Dec 1782 and Elizabeth Doughty born
                         7 Feb 1781 both of Accomac County, VA.
   
          Margaret G. Revell (8G) married 8 Jan 1840219 Tully Lilliston (8F1)

George C. Revell was a Corporal in Captain John G. Joynes' Company of the Second Regiment of Virginia Militia, Accomack County, in the Service of the United States commanded by Colonel Thomas M. Bayly for the years 1813 & 1814. Source: Military Records Virginia in the Revolution & War of 1812 Volume I Pay Rolls Page 314.

George Corbin Revell
24 Nov 1817

George Corbin Revell was the second son of John and Elizabeth Poulson Revell. He married Elizabeth Fosque on 17 Sep 1811220. Elizabeth was born in 1792. Children were: Nathaniel F. Revell, Margaret G. Revell and Catherine Corbin Revell. When George C. died Elizabeth Revell was appointed Guardian for all three of their children. Elizabeth Fosque Revell died Jan 20, 1854 at the age of 62 years. She was living in Drummondtown, now known as the town of Accomac. Info given by Nathaniel F. Revell.

Source: Register of Deaths, Accomac County 1854-1890

Proportional part of $375 pounds received of Thomas R. Joynes our agent for services of John Revell, your Grandfather during the Revolutionary War. Your part being one-third of $375. Nathaniel F. Revell was boarded with Elizabeth Revell from September 3, 1830 until June 3, 1832 at which time he left for Baltimore, Maryland.

Source: Orphans Accounts, Accomac County, Virginia 1819-1826, Pages 321/378/522, 328/379/523, and 324/377/524.

DEED OF ELIZABETH REVELL TO FRANCIS ONLEY
DATED JANUARY 9, 1818

This deed made the ninth day of January in the year eighteen hundred and eighteen between William Seymour, James Paulson and John B. Revell commissioners under an order of the county of Accomac in Chancery on the one part, Elizabeth Revell, widow of George C. Revell, deceased of the second part and Francis Onley, of the third part, all of the county of Accomac and the state of Virginia, witness that whereas by a decree of the county court of Accomac in Chancery made at the August term past in a suit in which Levin and Thomas Joynes were Plaintiffs and the heirs of George C. Revell, deceased were defendants, the said Seymour, Paulson, and John B. Revell were appointed commissioners for the purpose of selling to the highest bidder the track of land in which the said George Revell, deceased, lately resided, at which sale it was agreed between the said commissioners and the wife Elizabeth Revell that she should convey and relinquish to the purchaser her right of dower in the aforesaid land on her receiving whatever sum of money the County Court of Accomac should decide to be equivalent to her dower, therein and whereas at the sale so as made by the said commissioners. The aforesaid Francis Onley became the purchaser of the aforesaid tract of land at the price of five thousand dollars and whereas by a further decree of said court made at December term in the year 1817, the said court directed that the said Elizabeth Revell should be allowed the sum of two hundred pounds out of the sale of aforesaid land as the value of her dower. Whereas and that the aforesaid commissioners should convey the land aforesaid to the said Francis Onley the purchaser whereof. Now, therefore the said William Seymour, James Paulson and John B. Revell by virtue of the aforesaid decree of the county court of Accomac and obedient to the directive of the said decree and in consideration of the said Francis Onley having secured to the said Elizabeth Revell the payment of the sum of two hundred pounds for her dower in the aforesaid land, having paid and secured to the said commissioners the sum of thirteen hundred pounds, the balance of the purchase money for the said land. They, the commissioners, have bargained, granted and sold and by these presents do bargain, grant and sell to the said Francis Onley, his heirs, and assigns, forever, all that tract and parcel of land, aforesaid, containing by estimation, two hundred seventy acres, be the same, more or less situated on Onancock in the county aforesaid and being all the land of which George C. Revell, deceased, did seize, together with all the rights, privileges appertaining thereunto belong or in any way appertaining to have and to hold the tract of land aforesaid and the appurtenances to the said Francis Onley and his heirs and assigns forever, to and for the only purpose use benefit and be the said Francis Onley and his heirs and assigns the said Elizabeth Revell on her part and in consideration of the sum of two hundred pounds, having been paid to her, or secured to be paid by same Francis Onley hereby forever relinquishes, grants and conveys to the said Onley his said heirs and assigns, forever all the rights of dower as widow of George C. Revell, dec., of and to the aforesaid tract of land and the appurtenances thereof. In testimony where of the said William Seymour, James Paulson and John B. Revell and Elizabeth have herewith set their hands and affixed their seals.

William Seymour
James Paulson

In presence of:
John B. Revell
Elizabeth Revell
William Lee
Thomas Paul
Edward Snead

Source: Accomac County, Virginia Deed Book #16 1817 - 1818 Page 250

Notes: An interesting fact is that Elizabeth Revell widow of George Corbin Revell sells this land near Onancock Creek in 1817. Later she uses the signature Elizabeth M. Revell when selling land near Onancock Creek to Levin Laylor in 1840. Orders dated 30 Jan 1854 mistakenly show her as Elizabeth N. Revell when granting administration rights to her son Nathaniel Revell.

Orders 1819-1821 Page 58: 28 Feb 1818 Inventory and Sale: 29 Sep 1819 Audit and 29 Sep 1818  Received. James Poulson and William Revell; Administrators.

Negroes Abraham, George, Rose, Samuel, Sarah, Caleb and Lewis were sold. Buyer's were William Revell, James Revell and Elizabeth Revell. Appraisers were William Lee, Severn S. Logan and Edward R. Joynes. Elizabeth M. Revell received the balance of the audited amount.

Elizabeth M. Revell Sale of Property to William J. Laylor 1840

This Indenture made this the 1st day of February one thousand eight hundred and forty between Elizabeth M. Revell of the one part and William J. Laylor of the other part both of the County of Accomack and State of Virginia Witness: that the said Elizabeth M. Revell for and in consideration of the sum of eleven hundred dollars current money of the State of Virginia to her in hand paid by the said William J. Laylor at or before the sealing and delivery of these presents the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged have bargained, granted, sold and … and by these presents do bargain, grant, sell and confirm to the said William J, Laylor his heirs and assigns forever a certain tract of land containing fifty acres more of less not sold by the acre but by the maps and boundaries as follows: Northwardly by the lands belonging to Nath. Topping and William M. Riley west by a branch of Onancock Creek, which separates from the land of Nathaniel Topping east, and south by the land formerly belonging to Levin Laylor, deceased. To have and to hold the said tract of land aforesaid and the appurtenances to the William J. Laylor his heirs and assigns forever to the only proper use benefit and behoof of him the said William J. Laylor his heirs and assigns forever. And the said Elizabeth M. Revell for herself, her heirs and executors hereby covenant and agree too and with the said William J. Laylor his heirs and assigns, that at the time of the sealing and delivery of these presents, she the said Elizabeth M. Revell is seized of the premises aforesaid of and in a good indefensible estate of inheritance in fee simple that she has good right and lawful authority to sell and convey the same to the said William J. Laylor that the aforesaid William J. Laylor his heirs and assigns shall forever quietly and freely enjoy the premises free from encumbrances and that she will forever warrant and defend the premises to the said William J. Laylor his heirs and assigns free from the claims of all and every person and persons whosoever. In testimony whereof the said Elizabeth M. Revell has hereto set her hand and affixed her seal the day and year first above written.

Signed sealed and delivered in presence of:

                                                                                Elizabeth M. Revell (seal)

State of Virginia, Accomack County:

We, John Kinney and Nathaniel Topping Justices of the Peace in the county aforesaid in the State of Virginia do hereby certify that Elizabeth M. Revell party to a certain deed to William J, Laylor bearing date on the 1st. of February 1840 and hereto annexed this day personally appeared before us in our county aforesaid and being examined by us and having the deed aforesaid fully explained to her she the said Elizabeth M. Revell acknowledged the same to be her act and deed under our hands and seals this the 23 day of September 1840.

                                                                                    John Kinney
   
                                                             Nath Topping

Accomac County Clerks Office October 8, 1840

This Deed from Elizabeth M. Revell to William J. Laylor with the certificate of acknowledgement thereof thereto annexed was received … in the clerk's office … this day and admitted to the records.

Teste         J.J. Ailworth

Examined                                     For T… Joyce Clerk

Source: Clerk of Court Accomac County, Virginia Deed Book 30 Page 523

Note: In other court documents it appears that Elizabeth also purchased land from McKeel Bonniwell and Peggy his wife on 8/9/1821.

On a motion of Nathaniel F. Revell and John R. Watson taking oath and giving bond according to law in the penalty of Ten Thousand dollars ($10,000) with John Ailworth and Edmund R. Allen securities thereto -- Letters of Administration are granted to them on the estate of Elizabeth M. Revell, deceased. Ordered that Samuel E. Lilliston, James H. Coleburn, John J. Blackstone and Thomas J. Rayfield or any three of them being first duly sworn do appraise the personal estate of Elizabeth M. Revell, deceased and make return thereof to the Clerk of this Court.

Source: Orders 1851-1854 Page 530 & 531 Order Book is on the second floor of the Clerks Office.

Children of John B. (7K) and Rosie D. Seymour Revell (7K1)
   
     Rosie Seymour Revell (8J)221 born 1820222 died 1847 married 15 Dec 1840223 Isaiah N. Bagwell (8J1)

Children of John B. (7K) and Ann Wainhouse Hopkins Revell (7K2)
   
     Charles E. Revell (8K)
   
     Elizabeth Susan Revell (8L) born 3 Jul 1833224 died 10 Aug 1906 married 5 Apr 1854 to Daniel Titlow (8L1) born 
                13 Aug 1823 in Philadelphia, PA died 7 Feb 1871 son of Jacob and Catherine
Titlow.225

John B. Revell was a Lieutenant reporting to Captain Levin S. Joynes' Company of the Second Regiment of Virginia Militia, Accomack County, commanded by Colonel Thomas M. Bayly for the years 1813 & 1814. Source: Military Records Virginia in the Revolution & War of 1812 Volume I Pay Rolls Page 316.

Last Will and Testament of John Bagwell Revell
28 May 1835

Son of John and Elizabeth Poulson Revell

In the name of God, Amen. I, John B. Revell being of sound mind and memory do make and ordain this my last will and testament as follows:

I do hereby appoint Robert J. Poulson and James B. Poulson my Executors, likewise Edmond J. Poulson and Ellison A. Hopkins and Doctor E.W.P. Downing.

I wish all my lands to be sold by my executors and likewise my house and lot in Belle Haven by the same, whenever they may think it to be in the best interest of my estate to do so, as witness my hand and seal this 28th day of May 1835.

Teste:                                                                             John B. Revell             Seale

Edward L. Bayly
William Stakes, Sr.
Thomas S. Bull

At a court held for Accomack County on the 27th.day of July 1835. The last will and testament of John B. Revell deceased was proved in court by the oaths of Thomas S. Bull and William Stakes witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded. And on the motion of James B. Poulson and Robert J. Poulson two of the Executors therein named taking the oath and gave bond according to the law in the penalty of $30,000 dollars with James Poulson, Sr., Edmund J. Poulson, Edmund T. Bayly and John C. Wise securities, thereto certificate is granted their for obtaining a probate thereof in due form..

                                                    Teste:     Thomas R. Joynes Clerk of Court

Examined

Source: Accomac County Clerk of Court Will Book 1826-1646 Page 183

Married (1) Rosey Semour (listed wife on 25 Aug 1823)
   
Children were:
   
     Rosie Seymour Revell

              (2) Ann Hopkins (listed wife on 25 Apr 1826) After John's death, Ann remarried West.
   
Children were:
   
     Charles E. Revell
   
     Elizabeth Susan Revell

John B. Revell left Susan as an orphan. She was cared for by her mother C. E. Revell.  18 Sep 1843 recheck this record guardian must have been her brother.

Revell and Wife vs. Petition suit- Seymour

Court held 25 Aug 1823 page 240.

That a certain George Seymour late of the county of Accomac departed this life intestate sometime in or near the year 1803 leaving three children, viz. Elizabeth, Rosey Seymour, the mother of your oratrix Rosey Revell, and a certain William B. Seymour; and that the said George Seymour at the time of his death was seized in fee simple of a tract of land situate near Pungoteaque containing 400 acres and that the land descended to his three children aforesaid; that after the death of the said George Seymour, your oratrix, Elizabeth intermarried with your orator, William A. Christian, and the said Rosey Seymour intermarried with your orator, John B. Revell, and she has since died leaving issue of the said marriage your oratrix Rosey Revell who is her only child.

Source: Accomac County Land Causes 1728-1825 complied by Stratton Nottingham, Page 140.

Revell and Wife and children vs. Petition suit- Hopkins

Court held 25 Aug 1826 page 527

That Charles Hopkins late of this county departed this life intestate and without issue in the year 1825 leaving as his next of kin and heirs at law two sisters and one brother viz.: your oratrixes Susan, wife of Edmund Poulson, Ann wife of John B. Revell, and a certain Elison Hopkins. That the said Charles Hopkins at his death was seized in fee simple of a tract of land in Northampton County containing 167 1/2 acres which the said land at the death of the said Charles Hopkins descended to the aforesaid brother and sisters and children.

Source: Accomac County Land Causes 1728-1825 compiled by Stratton Nottingham Page 155.

Orders: Anna West Revell was sued by Rosie, Charles, and Susan (minors) through their court appointed guardians, for John B. Revell's property after his death. Anna was awarded dower rights and was paid off by the estate.

Children of Elizabeth Rebecca Revell Guy (7N) and Thomas H. Guy (7N1)
   
     Elizabeth Amanda Guy (8P) born 4 Jun 1827 died 23 Aug 1849

Children of Agnes Drummond Corbin (7S) and John Shepherd Ker
   
     Elizabeth Revell Corbin Ker (8Q) married William Seymour (8Q1)

Ninth Generation:

Children of Randall C. Revell and Virginia Laylor Revell
   
William J. Revell (9A) born 1839 in Elizabeth City County.
   
George Arthur Revell (9B) born 24 Nov 1841 in Elizabeth City County.
   
Randall C. Revell, Jr. (9C) born in 1844
   
John T. Revell (9D) born in 1847

Note: All four brother fought in the Civil War. George and Randall were in Pickets Charge at Gettysburg.

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS That we

Randall C. Revell and William C. Green

Are held and firmly bound unto David Campbell Esquire, Governor of this Commonwealth, in the just and full sum of one hundred and fifty dollars; to the payment whereof, well and truly to be made to the said Governor and his successors in office, we bind ourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, firmly by these presents. Sealed with our seals and dated this 27th day of September 1837.

The Condition of the above obligation is such, that

Whereas a marriage is shortly intended to be had and solemnized between the above bound Randall C. Revell and Miss Virginia Laylor.

Now if there be no lawful cause to obstruct the said marriage, then the above obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.

Signed and sealed in presence of:                             Randall C. Revell
A. Emmerson Jr.                                                           William C. Green

The above William Green made oath before me that the above named Virginia Laylor is above the age of twenty-one years.

A. Emmerson Jr.

Source: Marriage License Bureau Clerk of the Court. Norfolk County Courthouse Chesapeake, Virginia

DEED OF SALE OF LEGACY OF FRANCIS ONLEY

Know all men by these presents, that I, Randall C. Revell of the county of Accomac, state of Virginia, for and in consideration of the sum of one hundred dollars to me in hand paid by Lewis S. Snead of the same place, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, have bargained, granted, sold, and consigned and by these presents do bargain, grant, sell and convey to the said Lewis S. Snead and his heirs and assigns forever all my right, title and interest in and to a certain legacy of two hundred dollars given and bequeathed to me under the last will and testament of Francis Onley deed now recorded in the clerk's office of the county aforesaid which legacy is payable at the death of Margaret Ewell, the former wife of the said Francis Onley. I hereby relinquish to the said Lewis S. Snead and his heirs and assigns forever, all my rights, title and interest in the said legacy at the death of said Margaret Ewell, with full power and authority to receive the same, hereby warranting and defending the title of the said legacy to him the said Lewis S. Snead his heirs and assigns forever, free and clear from the lawful claims of all and every person, now or hereafter laying claim to the same or any part thereof by though or under me or any person claiming the same in my name, in testimony whereof I the said Randall C. Revell have hereto set his hand and affixed his seal, this 8th day of January 1836.

                                                                                                    Randall C. Revell

Signed and acknowledged as his act and deed in the presence of us:

Levin S. Joynes Jr.
Levin S. Lewis
William Custis Jr.
W.R. Joyner

Source: Deeds of Accomac County 1833 - 1837. Page 206

Randall C. Revell and Virginia Revell to William Laylor 1842

This Deed made the 6th day of September 1842 between Samuel C. White and Mary his wife, formerly Mary Chandler, Mitchell Chandler, John G. Chandler, Levin Laylor, Randall C. Revell of Virginia, his wife formerly Virginia Laylor, Richard Deans and Kazieh, his wife, formerly Kazieh Laylor, William Green, his wife Elizabeth, formerly Elizabeth Laylor and Cynthia Laylor of the first part and William Laylor of the other part. Whereas a certain Levin Laylor, father of the said William Laylor did by will executed on the 23rd day of December 1819 and recorded in the county court of Accomac, devise to the said William Laylor, by the name of Garababel William Laylor to Mary Elizabeth Laylor since deceased, a certain tract and parcel of land described in said will to them and their heirs, but if they should die without issue then he devised the same to the children of his brother Arthur Laylor and Kazieh, Mary and John Chandler to be equally divided between them and said parties of the first part have a contingent interest in the aforesaid land, dependant upon the said William Laylor dying without issue, same being willing to release all their interest in said land and said will to William Laylor. Now this deed witnesses that for and in consideration of fifty dollars in hand to the parties of the first part by William Laylor, the reception whereof is hereby acknowledged, the said Samuel White and Mary his wife, the same Mary named in the said Levin Laylor’s will, John Chandler also named in said will, and my brother Authur Laylor’s children named in said will of Levin, Elizabeth, Virginia, Kazieh having since been married as above stated who are the children and heirs of Authur Laylor, above named in said Levin Laylor’s will, do by these presents, grant, bargain, sell and convey quit claim to and release unto the said William Laylor his heirs and issue, all their rights, title and interest both at law and in equity in proportion … remainder of interest in the tract of land devised to said William Laylor by his father Levin Laylor as aforementioned and situated in Accomac County, Virginia bordered on the north by the land said William Laylor purchased of Elizabeth Revell and the land of Gull Snead and William I. Riley; east by the land of James Bonewell; south by a branch of Onancock Creek, which divides it from the land of Nath Toppery and containing by estimation, one hundred and fifty acres, be the same more or less, together with all the privileges appertaining thereto, in any wise appertaining or belonging to same, and to hold the above grants conveys interest and estate to him the said William J. Laylor and his heirs and issue forever, and they the parties of the first part do hereby covenant and agree to and with the said William J. Laylor and his heirs and issue that they will and their heirs shall defend the title to the above grant interest and estate to the said William J. Laylor and his heirs and issue, free and clear of the claims of themselves and their heirs and all persons, claims by or through them the children of the aforesaid Authur Laylor, but against the claims of no other persons whatsoever. In testimony whereof the parties of the first part have hereto set their hands and affixed their seal the same day and year written above.

Samuel C. White                     Mitchell Chandler                         Richard Deans
Mary C. White                        John Chandler                               Keziah Deans (her mark)
Levin Laylor                           Cynthia Laylor (her mark)
Randall C. Revell                   William C. Green (his mark)
Virginia Laylor (her mark)     Elizabeth C. Green (her mark)

Source: Clerk of Court, Accomac County, Virginia. Deed Book Number 32 (1842-1843) Page 327

General Notes: Virginia Laylor was born on December 15, 1814 in Accomac County, Virginia. Her parents were Arthur and Elizabeth Laylor. Her sister Elizabeth married William Green, who was Randall's best man in their marriage. Virginia inherited an interest in property her father inherited that passed through to his children in his will. Virginia and Randall and Elizabeth and William both signed a release of ownership to the property, and Virginia’s brother became sole owner of the Eastern Shore land. Virginia died of bowel consumption on November 23, 1865 and is buried with her husband at Cedar Grove Cemetery, Portsmouth, Virginia. The informant listed on her death certificate is her sister, Elizabeth Greene who was living with her at the time. The burial lot was originally owned by Mr. S. B. Laylor. Randall was the first buried there in what I believe was an unmarked grave. I also believe that after Virginia and two of her sons (William J. and John T.) were buried there that George A. Revell erected the "Our Family" marker and that explains why a common marker was used instead of one on each individual grave. After their marriage Randall and Virginia moved to Elizabeth City County, Virginia (Hampton) where Randall is listed as head of household in the 1840 census. The census shows five members of the household. The breakdown is as follows:

Male  over 40 under 50
Female  over 40 under 50
Male  over 20 under 30  (Randall C. Revell)
Female  Female over 20 under 30  (Virginia T. Revell)
Male   under 5 (William J. Revell)
Female 

Children born during Randall and Virginia's marriage listed in the order of age are:
William J. Revell born 1839 in Elizabeth City County.
George Arthur Revell born November 24, 1841 in Elizabeth City County.
Randall C. Revell, Jr. born in 1844
John T. Revell born in 1847

Just before or after Randall's death, the family moved back to Norfolk County where Virginia is shown as head of household in the 1850 census. Her sister Elizabeth was living with her also.

William J. Revell born 1839; died 1864 buried in Cedar Grove. (25 Years old) joined Company H, 3rd Virginia Infantry, Virginia National on April 20, 1861. He died in Jackson Hospital on March 6, 1864 of chronic diarrhea brought on by fighting in the swamps of Virginia and North Carolina during the Civil War. There is a monument erected in Norfolk on April 3, 1875 dedicated to the memory of his Infantry Company. His name is inscribed.

George Arthur Revell (Great Grandfather) born November 24, 1841 in Elizabeth City County; and died in his residence in Norfolk. He married Martha Ann Hodges on January 14, 1868. George enlisted in the Portsmouth Rifle Company, Company G, 9th Virginia Infantry Regiment, CSA on May 15, 1861. He was taken prisoner on July 3, 1863 at the battle of Gettysburg. He was held at Fort Mc Henry, Maryland transferred to Fort Delaware, Delaware and then to Point Lookout, Maryland were he was sent to be exchanged with 2051 other prisoners at Coxes Landing on the James River in Virginia on February 13, 1865. A monument erected to honor the memory of Company "G" is located in Cedar Grove Cemetery. His and Randall's name are inscribed.

Randall C. Revell, Jr. Enlisted in Portsmouth Rifle Company, Company G, 9th Virginia Infantry Regiment, CSA Company on March 26, 1862. This was the same outfit as his brother George. He was 18 years old at the time. He was wounded at Gettysburg but escaped with his outfit and was admitted to Winder Hospital where his wounds were treated. He was transferred to Chimborazo Hospital and recuperated from August 13 to October 1, 1863. He returned to action and was captured at Five Folks on April 1, 1865 just before the war ended. He was released on June 9, 1865 at Point Lookout, Maryland and disappeared. The National Archives in Washington or Confederate War Records may offer additional information. No known marriage or children.

John T. Revell. Again I don't know much. He was born in 1847 and died in 1869. He is buried in Cedar Grove. He may have been the John Revell that joined St. Bride's Light Artillery, Company I, 38th Virginia Regiment (National Grey's) CSA.

Sources:         Births from Circuit Court, Portsmouth, Va. Registry of Births 1858 to 1896.
                        Deaths from Circuit Court, Portsmouth, Va. Registry of Deaths 1858 to June 13, 1912.
                        Birth Records City of Portsmouth Health Department 1900 to 1912.
                        Death Records City of Portsmouth Health Department 1881 to 1909.
                        Death Records State Health Department, Richmond, VA, 1910 to present.
                        Birth Records State Health Department, Richmond, VA, June 14, 1912 to present.
                        Cemetery Records from Cedar Grove, Oak Grove, and St. Paul's.
                        U.S. Census 1830, 1840, 1850, 1860, 1870 and 1880.

Children of Elizabeth Colbourn Revell (8E1) and Nathaniel F. Revell (8E)
   
     Grandson- Nathaniel Randolph Revell born 1897 married 18 Apr 1918 to Nellie May Wharton226

Children of Catherine Revell Watson (8F) and John R. Watson (8F1)
   
     Rebecca Ann Watson (9J) born 12 Oct 1838 died 1 Jul 1909 married 12 Jan 1859 to Henry D. Carmine (9J1) 
                born 1834 son of James & Elizabeth Carmine.
   
     Indiana S. Watson (9K) born 14 Feb 1844 died 25 Jan 1923 married 12 Nov 1873 to Louis J. Ross (9K1) born 
                1843 son of Jacob M. & Sarah A. Ross.
   
     Virginia E. Watson (9L) 14 Sep 1845 died 23 Dec 1890 married 21 Dec 1870 to George Dallas Scarborough (9L1) 
                born 1844 son of Amenicus & Mary Scarborough227
          George Corbin Watson (9M) born 28 Jan 1847 died 27 Aug 1912 married 6 Jan 1869 to Susane A. Chandler (9M1) 
                born 1849 daughter of Thomas and Sarah Chandler228.
   
     Margaret C. Watson (9N) born 1 Sep 1852 died 27 Aug 1927 married Frances B. Merrill (9N1)
   
     Catherine Revell Watson (9O) born ca. 1854 died 15 Dec 1882 in Accomac, VA

Children of Margaret G. Revell Lilliston (8G) and Tully Lilliston (8G1)
                        Annie E. Lilliston (9R) born 1844 in Accomac County, VA.
                        George Lilliston (9S) born 1847 in Accomac County, VA.
                        Eveline Lilliston (9T) in Accomac County, VA.
                        Margaret (Peggy) Lilliston (9U) born 1851 in Accomac County, VA.
                        Elizabeth Lilliston (9V) born 1854 in Accomac County, VA.
                        Unknown Boy Lilliston (9W) born Apr 1857 died 15 Jun 1857229 in Accomack County, VA.
                        Eugene Lilliston (9X) born 1858 in Accomac County, VA.

Tenth Generation:

Grandson of Nathaniel F. Revell

Nathaniel R. Revell born 15 Jan 1898 died 18 May 1963 married to Amory Dunton born 7 Dec 1905 died 1 Aug 1965. Nathaniel served in World War II. Both he and Amory are buried at Red Bank Baptist Church Cemetery in Marionville on Virginia's Eastern Shore.

While the Eastern Shore of Virginia contained several Revell families after 1820 only the descendants of Nathaniel F. Revell and William Revell are of the Virginia line. The Revell family located in the town of Atlantic and the descendants of John C. Revell who located to Portsmouth while related, are actually descendants of the Maryland and Delaware branches of the Revell family. My daughter Christine Hernandez and her husband Carlos are the first of the original Virginia line to move back onto the Virginia Eastern Shore since my ancestor left the Shore in 1834. Carlos is a Chief Bosuns Mate presently serving as Officer in Charge Coast Guard Station Cape Charles.

All information has been verified whenever possible. Mistakes happen. If you note any discrepancy please let me know. Corrections will be checked and the document will be updated. A later document will trace the Maryland Revell family. Additional information is available but was not entered, as it was not considered as pertinent to this article.

James R. Revell, Sr.
04 February 2003
(757) 565-5533

Copywright in 2002 by James R. Revell, Sr. 1524 Lauren Ashleigh drive Chesapeake, Virginia 23321-1846
Email
jim@revell.com. Document includes approximately 75 pages in Word format using 10 point font.

Loose Ends…………………..

17 Jun 1781. Colonel George Corbin to Governor Jefferson

Since his last letter giving account of the state of affairs in the County, "matters wear a much better aspect" - For particulars, refers him to the bearer Captain Abraham Outon, who goes to receive the commission mentioned in his late letter, which he hopes his Excellency will not refuse- desires a commission also "for a young Gent: of the name of John Revell, who has purchased a whale boat and engaged his men for the same purpose:. The filling up of these commissions will much oblige the friends of American Independence in his Country.

Source: Calendar of State Papers Page 166.

John Randall Revell was a private in Captain John G. Joynes' Company of the Second Regiment of Virginia Militia, Accomack County, commanded by Colonel Thomas M. Bayly for the years 1813 & 1814. Source: Military Records Virginia in the Revolution & War of 1812 Volume II Muster Roll Page 510.


Endnotes
  1. Member of the Virginia House of Burgesses in 1657/8, the Eighth of the Commonwealth, representing Northampton County.   Randall was also a Member of the Maryland Assembly.
  2. Randall Revell appeared in Accomack court Jan 1633/34, 19 February 1634 and September 1636 and testified as to his age.    Mathematically,  this proves that he was born in 1613. Records are now in Northampton County Clerk of the Courts Office in     Eastville, Virginia Volume I  pages 10, 28 and 57.
  3. The Peopling of Virginia by Robert Bennett Bean page 8 and Huguenot Emigration To Virginia by R. A. Brock, page VI. Randall  was with  the French Huguenots that landed in Virginia in 1632 which remains as yet, unproven.
  4. Liber MA #1 Folio 825/826 and Liber EB #5 Folio 141. Of special note is the fact that two wills were actually written on the same day. The second will corrected several mistakes presented in the first will, which was never destroyed. Liber MA#1 Folio 825/826,  which was the second, will is the official Revell will. Mrs. Katherine Revell, Randall’s wife requested that the first written will also  be recorded. This will is found in Liber EB #5 Folio 141 and mistakenly names Randall’s son as Randolph and calls Ms. Ann Toft by her maiden name rather than her  married name which is now Mrs. Ann West.
  5. Scarburgh family bible. See Maryland Revell lineage.
  6. Somerset County, Maryland Princess Anne Courthouse, Liber Number 14 Folio 70.
  7. Old Somerset on the Eastern Shore of Maryland by Clayton Torrence notes for chapter two on page 487 state that "all of the official documents at the Archives of Maryland prove that Revell was settled in Manokin in the early spring, March 1661/2."
  8.  Liber 6 Folio 347
  9. Ibid, 339.
  10.  Ibid, 350
  11. Randall Revell’s LWT and Old Somerset on the Eastern Shore of Maryland by Clayton Torrence, Page 456.
  12. Liber MA #1 Folio 825/826 and Liber EB #5 Folio 141. Of special note is the fact that several wills were actually written on the same day.  The second will made several clarifications of information which were presented in the first will and the first will was never destroyed. Liber MA#1 Folio 825/826 contains the official Revell will (the second will). Mrs. Katherine Revell, Randall’s wife requested that the first written will also be recorded. This will is found in Liber EB #5 Folio 141 and mistakenly names Randall’s son "Randolph" and also calls Ms. Ann Toft by the name of Ann West.
  13. Hening 429-432 and York County Records 1658.
  14. Edward Revell of Pungoteaque, Virginia was the only son of Randall and Rebecca Nichols Revell. Many researchers have stated that    Randall and Rebecca had two additional sons named John and Richard Revell. In fact, Rebecca Nichols had a son John (Randall’s stepson) by a previous marriage. The misconception began when Randall transported himself, Rebecca his wife, Edward his son, John Nichols his step-son and Richard Nevill, (Ark & The Dove) Randall’s man-servant into Maryland (Liber 1 Folio 65 and ABH Folio 79). Later when  recording a land patent dated 27 Jul 1641 John and Richard were recorded as Randall’s sons. From then on both men had been misconstrued to be Randall’s sons. In fact John and Richard accompanied Randall back and forth across the Virginia and Maryland line on several occasions. In late 1642 Randall moved back to Virginia. However, on 25 Aug 1641 in preparation for his return to Virginia, he deeds 50 acres of land to Richard Nevill. Later while residing in Northampton County in Virginia, Randall deeded some cattle to my son in law (stepson) John Nichols (April 1656) and later in August 1657 deeds cattle and horses to his only son Edward The Virginia Historical Magazine and Biography, Volume 23 written in 1915 on pages 84 and 85 also document these events.
  15. Member of the Virginia House of Burgesses 1683-1684 term representing Accomac County as taken from The Virginia Historical Magazine,  Pages 236 & 238.
  16. Northampton County, Clerk of the Court Orders 1657-1664 on page 40, Edward testified in open court in 1658 stating that he was 20 years of age or thereabouts.
  17. Will Book 6, 1676-1690 6 Oct 1686 probated on 17 Jan 1687 Page 461 names children.
  18. Will Book 1673-1676 page 152. Will of Thomas Fowkes leaves to each and every grandchild of my wife’s: to godchild Rachael, daughter of Edward Revell etc. which may establish a relationship with Frances. To date Frances’ last name is unproven. However, I have heard "Burton" more than once.
  19. Will Book 1692-1715 page 166 probated on 3 Aug 1697. Leaves to grand daughters and names children.
  20. Will Book 1715-1720 page 255 Rachael names her children and some of their husbands.
  21. Built "Ravenswood" on a tract of 975 acres on "Ye Great Neck of Ye Metompkins" also known as "Custis Neck" which remained in the Custis family for 233 years also Virginia’s Eastern Shore by Ralph T. Whitelaw pages 881 & 882.
  22. Will Book 1692-1715 page 466 Henry names some of his children and wife, Rachael.
  23. Younger brother of Major General John Custis Whitlaw Page 867 and will of William Sacker dated 7 Nov 1688. William married three times; Joan Hall widow of Francis Stockley was his 1st. wife.
  24. The Genealogy of the Custis Family contained inside The Register of Maryland's Heraldic Families 1634-1935 located in the Sargent Room, New Kirn Library, in Norfolk, Virginia.
  25. Virginia's Eastern Shore Page 867 by Ralph T. Whitelaw.
  26. Accomac County Will Book 6 Apr 1698 and probated 7 Jun 1698 names children and wife.
  27. Ibid. 1692-1715 Part 1 page 481. Inventory of the Estate of Robert Colbourne states that Rebecca is now the wife of Francis Wharton
  28. Virginia's Eastern Shore by Ralph T. Whitelaw page 1119 names several Wharton relations. And LWT of Francis Wharton written 6 Oct 1695 probated 4 Jun 1700 names more.
  29. John Revell is the son of Edward and Frances Revell. Frances was Edward’s only wife.  Ancestral Records And Portraits on page 484 mistaking reports that Edward married twice, his second wife being Rachel and that John is their son. The fact is that Frances outlived Edward
  30. On 12 Jun 1689 John Revell of Accomac County, VA filed suit against his grandfather, Randall Revell, Srs. estate in Somerset County, MD for 1,400 pounds of Tobacco and casks which was due 23 Nov 1685. Randall Revell, Jr. the estate administrator refused payment without a court order. Maryland State Archives Volume 91 Page 123.
  31. John Revell’s will dated 31 Aug 1726, probated 4 July 1727 leaves to daughters Ann Revell,  Rachael now wife of Abel Upshur, Sarah, to son Edward and to granddaughters Sarah and Rachael Revell. Accomac County Wills 1715-1729 Page 137.
  32. Will Book 5 Jan 1695 - 18 Feb 1695 page 100. William Burton’s will leaves to 9 sons and daughter Agnes Revell, grandchildren Frances, Elizabeth and Edward Revell and son-in-law John Revell.
  33. Information supplied by William S. Burton MD of Nassawadox, Virginia
  34. Named in Grandfather's will 5 Jan 1695.
  35. Named in Grandmother's will 6 Sep 1711.
  36. LW&T 8 Dec 1718 proven 3 May 1720 names children.
  37. Rachael Custis' will names daughter Frances as wife of Thomas Stringer and grandson as John Stringer.
  38. Named in grandfather Edward Revell's will dated 6 Oct 1686. Parents were married in 1863. Therefore Frances could not be more than 3 years old and Elizabeth two years old.
  39. Will written 6 Sep 1744 names children.
  40. Rachael Custis' will names daughter Elizabeth as wife of Shield and grandson as William Sacker Shield
  41. Will Book 1737-1743 page 533 names seven children and confirms William Sacker Shield as eldest.
  42. Inherited Ravenswood from his father and mother in 1720.
  43. Will Book 1737-1743 Page 175 proved 1 Aug 1739. Edward Custis' LWT names his children and grandchildren.
  44. Wills & Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1663-1800 complied by Stratton Nottingham Page 142.
  45. Orders 1737-1744 page 576 Edward Revell qualifies as administrator of Revell Custis' estate.
  46. Revell Family History, Register of Maryland’s Heraldic Families Page 127 and Genealogy of the Custis Family, New Kirn Library, Norfolk, VA.
  47. Orders 1744-1753 Page 546 found in Wills & Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1663-1800 complied by Stratton Nottingham Page 139. Scarburgh Custis his widow qualifies as administrator of the estate. Charles West and George Holden are security.
  48. LWT of Henry Scarburgh 4 Oct 1744 names Henry Custis as brother in law.
  49. Orders 1744-1753 Page 179 found in Wills & Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1663-1800 complied by Stratton Nottingham Page 133. Mary Custis qualifies as administrator of the estate. Richard Rogers is security.
  50. Mary's brother, Fairfax Onley names Mary Custis in his LWT dated 6 Mar 1737/8 probated 6 Jun 1738.
  51. Sarah Custis Watson qualified to be administrator for her husband Thomas Watson's estate but was removed by Orders dated 26 Feb 1740 Page 234 due to illness. Orders dated 27 May 1740 qualified her estate to be administered by John Scarburgh and George Douglas as security on page 263.
  52. Orders 1737-1744 names Sarah Watson, Thomas' widow as administrator of his estate, William Andrews, John Fitzgerald and John Parker are security. 25 Jun 1739 page 154.
  53. Accomac County Will Book 1752-1757 page 54 names son and daughter, grandchild and spouse.
  54. Descendants of Randall Revell contained in the Mear's Collection at Eastern Shore Library.
  55. See John Parker's LW&T 25 Aug 1754 proved 1 Jan 1755.
  56. Wills & Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1663-1800 complied by Stratton Nottingham Page 140 as per Bo Lewis of Cheriton, VA
  57. Stratton Nottingham's Wills & Administrations of Accomack County 1663-1800 pages 20, 24 and 64.
  58. Birth date computed from fathers LW&T.
  59. LW&T written 13 Jan 1751 and proved 30 Jun 1752. Names wife as Temperance and children.
  60. LWT names father in law as Capt. John Bagwell and all children. Found in Wills & Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1663-1800 complied by Stratton Nottingham Page 143
  61. LWT names father as Frances Wharton and all children. Found in Wills & Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1663-1800 complied by Stratton Nottingham Page 154.
  62. Orders 1737-1744 names Elizabeth Bagwell, Thomas' widow as administrator of his estate. Edward Revell and Robert Coleburn are security. 26 Feb 1739/40 page 232.
  63. Orders 1737-1744 page 321 found in Wills & Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1663-1800 complied by Stratton Nottingham Page 114. Bridget qualifies as administrator of the estate.
  64. Wills & Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1663-1800 complied by Stratton Nottingham Page 120. Edward Custis names his daughter Bridget as wife of Revel Wharton.
  65. Will Book 6 Sep 1711-4 Mar 1711 page 560 Ann Burton Alexander (wife of William Burton) leaves to 9 Burton sons and granddaughters Elizabeth Revell, Ann Revell, Rachael Revell, Sarah Revell, grandson Edward Revell and son-in-law John Revell.
  66. William Burton grandfather to Rebecca, Elizabeth and Edward named all three in his LW&T written 5 Jan 1695.
  67. Somerset County, MD Will Book EB#4 1760-1769 Folio 80 written 8 Oct 1754 proved 9 Sep 1761.
  68. Will Book 1752-1757 22 Mar 1753- 25 Sep 1753 Page 200 Edward leaves to wife Rebecca, to son John and to two daughters Agnes Horsey and Catherine Revell. To grandson William Custis, to daughter Rachael Tilney, to granddaughter Elizabeth Leatherbury.
  69. Ancestral Records and Portraits page 484. Also unknown book Chapter IV Abel Upshur I pages 31 and 32 list many family relations and deaths.
  70. Rachel's father John Revell's LW&T states that Rachel is married to Abel Upshur.
  71. Ancestral Records and Portraits page 485. Will Book 1752-1757 2 Sep 1753 29 Jan 1754 Abel names all his children. Rachael has already passed on and is not mentioned.
  72. Will Book 1752-1757 Died 6 Nov 1756 probated 30 Nov 1756 leaves to sisters Sarah and Mary.
  73. Grandmother Ann Stratton Burton Alexander named granddaughters in her LW&T dated 6 Sep 1711.
  74. Accomack County Orders 1790-1793 page 501 Administration of estate to John Wise. Mary Rodgers, widow of Zorobabel relinquished her right to qualify on 29 Jan 1793.
  75. Wills & Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1663-1800 complied by Stratton Nottingham Page 380.
  76. Virginia's Eastern Shore by Ralph T. Whitelaw Page 799. Property was next door to that of John Revell, Mary's father.
  77. Rachael Custis' will names daughter Frances as wife of Thomas Stringer and grandson as John Stringer.
  78. Accomac County Orders 1768-1769 Administration of estate to Elizabeth Stringer.
  79. Accomac County Wills & Administrations Will of Fereby Stringer written 25 Mar 1776 proved 23 Feb 1779 names wife as Rachel.
  80. Accomac County Wills & Administrations Will of Thomas Stringer 12 Apr 1764 names William Savage as his brother-in-law.
  81. Accomac County LW&T written 22 Jan 1761 proved 31 Mar 1761
  82. Rachael Custis' will names daughter Elizabeth as wife of Shield and grandson as William Sacker Shield
  83. Accomac County LW&T 13 Apr 1767 proved 29 Apr 1767 names wife and two children.
  84. Delight Shield's LW&T dated 16 Nov 1742 proven on 1 Feb 1743 names Rachel as wife of Abel Badger.
  85. Will Book 1737-1743 Page 175, Edward Custis' LWT names his children and grandchildren.
  86. Whitelaw Page 881
  87. Information taken from white paper of Bea Latimer June 2002.
  88. Will Book 1749-1752 Joshua James 23 Jan 1749, proved 27 Feb 1750 and probated 27 Mar 1750. Left names godson Henry Custis (son of Sarah Revell Custis) who is under the age of 21.
  89. LWT names children, wife and brother.
  90. Digital Bible Records at the Library of Virginia per the Bible Records of Tabitha Custis Goodson, daughter of Henry Custis and Tabitha West. Discovered Terry Jackson.
  91. Wills and Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1663-1800 by Stratton Nottingham, Page 179.  Will of Edward Revell 22 Mar 1753, probated 25 Sept 1753 names grandson William Custis.
  92. Edward Revell's LWT names Edward Custis as his grandson.
  93. Orders 1790-1793 Revell Custis' estate is administered by Southy Satchell and Revel Custis security.
  94. The Genealogy of the Custis Family contained inside The Register of Maryland's Heraldic Families 1634-1935 located in the Sargent Room, New Kirn Library, Norfolk, Virginia.
  95. Scarburgh Custis is named as daughter of Tabitha Custis in the LW&T of Patience Allen Custis 2 Oct 1744.
  96. Whitelaw Page 853.
  97. Taken from the notes of Bill Leatherbury as published on GHOTES web-site.
  98. Children named in LW&T of John Parker 1715-1729 page 296.
  99. Children named in Wills and Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1663-1800 by Stratton Nottingham, Page 177 and Page 230.
  100. Children named in LW&T dated 20 Oct 1748 proved on 27 Feb 1749.
  101. Clerk of Court Somerset County and Coventry Parish records.
  102. Somerset County, MD Will Book Liber #5 1770-1778 Folio 96.
  103. Estate administered by his wife, Elizabeth Horsey. Elizabeth is named in father-in-laws LWT dated 8 Oct 1754 proved 9 Sep 1761 in Somerset County, MD. Will also states that John Horsey is deceased.
  104. Wills and Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1663-1800 by Stratton Nottingham, Page 179.  Will of Edward Revell 22 Mar 1753, probated 25 Sept 1753 names wife, Rebecca, son John, daughters Agnes Horsey, Catherine Revell and Rachael Tilnay., grandson William Custis and grand-daughter Elizabeth Leatherbury.
  105. Will Book 7 Nov 1756-22 Feb 1757 page 388 Rebecca Revell names some children, grand-children and others.
  106. Orders 1737-1744 Revell Custis’ estate administered by Edward Revell 29 May 1744 page 580.
  107. Edward Revell's will names granddaughter Elizabeth Leatherbury, daughter of Rachael and her deceased husband, Thomas Leatherbury.
  108. Will Book 1749-1752 Joshua James 23 Jan 1749, proved 27 Feb 1750 and probated 27 Mar 1750. Left to wife Rachael after payment of debts, states that no child has yet been born of this marriage, names Godson Henry Custis (son of Sarah Revell Custis) who is under the age of 21and son in law; Charles Leatherbury (son of Rachael and Thomas Leatherbury).
  109. Edward Revell's will names his daughter Rachael as married to William Tilney
  110. Died intestate. Accomac County Orders 1764-1765 dated 26 Jun 1764 page 146 names Leah Revell as the Administrator of the estate with James Scott and Luke Luker as security.
  111. Will Book 8 Sep 1743-25 Oct 1743 page 499. Robert Corbin names wife Ann and children of which Leah is mentioned.
  112. Will Book 1794-1796 21 Jun 1796 – 25 Jul 1796 page 405. Leah Corbin Revell Seymour’s will names the Revell and Seymour children also states that Sarah Revell married a Poulson.
  113. LW&T written 9 Nov 1776 proved 31 Dec 1776 .Wills and Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1663-1800 by Stratton Nottingham, Page 299 also names children.
  114. The Miles Files (Leah Corbin)
  115. Will proved 4 Feb 1777 Somerset County Liber EB#5 1770-1778 Folio 96
  116. Will proved 27 Jan 1806. Names many nieces and nephews.
  117. LDS files located in Portsmouth Public Library, Portsmouth, VA.
  118. Will dated 19 Jul 1778 and proved on 25 Aug 1778 leaves to wife Catherine, will also names John Revell of Pungoteaque (5A) deceased and his children John, Sarah, William and Edward Revell.
  119. LWT written 5 Sep 1781 proved 30 Mar 1784. Names children.
  120. LWT written 26 Nov 1790 proved 5 Apr 1792. Names grandchildren and two daughters-in-law.
  121. Buried on the Dennis burial plot at Beverly Manor near Pocomoke City, MD. DAR Volume 8 Page 67.
  122. All information taken from A Somerset Sampler-Families of Old Somerset County, Maryland 1700-1776 compiled by the Lower Delmarva Genealogical Society.
  123. Henning’s State Papers and Ancestral Records and Portraits page 484 & 485 under "Revell"
  124. Orders 1777-1780 Administration of the Estate of Caleb Upshur to John and Abel Upshur dated 24 Nov 1778 Page 255.
  125. Per Jeanne email
  126. LW&T of Edward Custis proved on 25 Jun 1765 names wife and children.
  127. The Genealogy of the Custis Family contained inside The Register of Maryland's Heraldic Families 1634-1935 located in the Sargent Room, New Kirn Library, Norfolk, Virginia.
  128. Paul Revell. Still unproven.
  129. Last Will and Testament of Francis Ounley, Accomac County, Virginia 1832."I give to George Custis my wife’s brother one hundred dollars." "I give to Randall C. Revell two hundred dollars."
  130. Information supplied by John Custis Ross of Incline Village, NV as contained in GHOTEs Digest #633.
  131. Marriage License Bonds of Accomack County, VA from 1774 to 1806 by Stratton Nottingham Page 9.
  132. Marriage License Bonds of Accomack County, VA from 1774-1806 by Stratton Nottingham. Page 9.
  133. Accomac Land Causes 1728-1825 compiled by Stratton Nottingham, Page 96 names wife and children of Thomas Stringer and that Margaret Stringer is now married to Revel Custis. Dated 27 Nov 1811.
  134. Information taken from a letter written 2 Apr 1896 by Alfred Frank Custis, Jr. a Philadelphia Lawyer and passed to me by John Custis Ross through the GHOTES Digest 7 Jun 2002 Volume 04 Number 628.
  135. Last Will and Testament of Francis Ounley, Accomac County, Virginia 1832.
  136. Randall C. Revell's Deed of Sale of Legacy of Francis Onley states that Margaret his widow in now married to Ewell. Dated 8 Jan 1836.
  137. Whitelaw Page 944.
  138. Wills & Administrations of Accomack County 1663-1800 Page 150 compiled by Stratton Nottingham.
  139. Edward Revell recorded as Captain in 1777; oath 30 Jul 1777 per Virginians in the Revolution Page 658.
  140. Edward appears in Accomack County Personal Property Tax Records 1782-1790
  141. Orders 1790-1793 Administration of Edward Revell’s estate to George Ker, John Shepherd Ker and Samuel Galt. John Treakle, Sr. security 28 Dec 1791on page 300.
  142. District Court Records W.D. 1789-1799 17 May 1786- 18 Oct 1790 page 20. Edward Ker’s will list his children as George Ker, John Sheppard Ker, Hugh Ker, Edward Ker, Jean Ker Scarbrough, Catherine Ker Christian and Ann Ker Revell, Elizabeth Ker. A later codicil states that Ann Ker Revell is deceased. Also mentions daughters Elizabeth, Margaret and Isabel.
  143. 18th Century Virginia Newspaper obituary appeared 23 Apr 1788.
  144. LW&T of Edward Ker 17 May 1786 proved 18 Oct 1790 names his daughter Ann Revell. A codicil written on 28 Sep 1788 states that Ann Revell is deceased.
  145. Susannah West LW&T proved on 30 Sep 1806 names her four children as: Edmond Revell, John Rowles West, Anameriah West, and Revell West. Edmond is not of legal age
  146. Mrs. Susannah Revell received 22.9 pounds from John Ker Revell administrator of Edward's estate on 18 Oct 1793. There was an order to Audit issued by the courts on 25 Mar 1822.
  147. Abstracts of the Wills & Administrations of Accomack County Virginia 1800- 1860 by Miles & Miles Page 594.
  148. Orders Book 1783-1784 William Revell, administration of his estate to George Dunton, Ezekiel Young and John Roles security. 24 Feb 1784 page 186.
  149. George Dunton named one of his daughters Catherine Revell Dunton. George died 24 Sep 1792 and two of his daughters Catherine Revell and Nancy Dunton were boarded with John Revell who died in 1806.
  150. John appears in Accomack County Personal Property Tax Records from 1787- 1806.
  151. Will Book 1806-1809 page 127, will written 26 Nov 1806 names sons George Corbin Revell, William Revell, John B. Revell, James Revell, Edward Revell, daughters Elizabeth and Sally Revell and wife Elizabeth.
  152. Accomac County, Virginia Marriages.
  153. Elizabeth Revell, widow of John, appears in Accomack County Personal Property Tax Records 1809-1823.
  154. Accomack County Orders 1815-1817 Page 501. John B. Revell is appointed Administrator of Estate.
  155. LW&T of James Scott dated 19 Jul 1778 names Sarah, William, Edward and John Revell as children of John Revell, deceased.
  156. Wills and Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1800-1860 Page 440 by Miles and Miles LW&T written 21 Oct 1821 proved 29 Oct 1821.
  157. Virginia's Eastern Shore by Ralph T. Whitelaw Page 915.
  158. Scott Hall Burying Ground in Onancock, VA. Inscriptions copied by Sarah Parker in 1930 and distributed by the Ker House in Onancock.
  159. Internet 4th generation notes.
  160. Virginians in the Revolution and War of 1812 Page 658. Edward Revell, Accomac military recorded as Captain 25 Mar 1777; Oath administered 30 Jul 1777
  161. Accomack Land Causes 1728-1825 by Stratton Nottingham. Page 50 and 51. John S. Ker vs. Others, names John, Margaret and Leah Revell as children of Ann Ker and Ann Ker as his sister. Suit was heard on 4 Mar 1801, page 256.
  162. Calendar of State Papers Jan 30 1802 and 30 Jun 1804, Captain John Revell commands the Troop of  Calvary known as the 4th Regiment 9th Brigade stationed in Accomac Virginia January 1802.
  163. John Ker appears in Accomack County Personal Property Tax Records 1805-1810.
  164. Accomac County, Virginia Marriages. Marriage License Bonds of Accomac County VA 1774-1806 by Stratton Nottingham on Page24 shows 28 Feb 1805.
  165. Worcester County, Maryland Will Book 1806-1813 Folio 151 LW&T of Bowdin Robins names father and brother-in-law, John Revell.
  166. Accomack Land Causes 1728-1825 by Stratford Nottingham. Page 51 gives Leah’s death date and states that she died under the age of 21 without issue. Suite was heard of 23 Mar 1803 Page 262.
  167. Edward A. appears in Accomack County Personal Property Tax Records 1814-1832. In 1824 and thereafter record calls Edward A. "Captain" which is probably an industry title.
  168. Accomack Land Causes 1728-1825 by Stratford Nottingham. Page 50 and 51. John Revell Jr. vs Others, names John, Margaret and Leah Revell as children of Edward and Ann Ker and Edward Revell Jr. as son of Edward Revell by a second marriage. Suit was heard on 23 Mar 1803, page 262.
  169. Worcester County, MD Marriage Licenses 1795-1865 by Mary Beth & Vanessa Long Page 36.
  170. Death notice appeared in Richmond, VA newspaper.
  171. Abstracts of the Wills & Administrations of Accomack County Virginia 1800- 1860 by Miles & Miles Page 594.
  172. Gunners Mate in the Virginia Navy in the American Revolution. Participated in the Battle of the Barges
  173. Revolutionary War Records of Soldiers, Accomac County Virginia Page 23. Court held on 31 Jan 1831 page 220 states that John served in the Virginia State Navy during the Revolutionary War and list all heirs.
  174. William appears in Accomack County Personal Property Tax Records 1811-1828. In 1818 and thereafter record calls William "Captain" which is probably an industry title.
  175. Member of Captain John G. Joynes's Company of the Second Regiment from Accomack County Company during the War of 1812. Served as a Sergeant per VA. Military Records Militia of the War of 1812 Volume I Pay Rolls on Page 314.
  176. Accomac County, Virginia Marriage Register Page 11.
  177. Member of Captain John G. Joynes's Company of the Second Regiment from Accomack County Company during the War of 1812. Served as a Corporal per VA. Military Records Militia of the War of 1812 Volume I Pay Rolls on Page 314.
  178. George Corbin appears in Accomack County Personal Property Tax Records 1812-1817.
  179. Died Intestate. Elizabeth sells land with aid of Commissioners. Land sold to Frances Onley In 1819. Court Orders dated 31 Jan Accomack County Death Register 1853-1892 1831 page 220 as listed in Solders and Sailors of Accomac County by Stratton J. Nottingham lists children as Nathaniel F. Revell, Catherine Revell and Margaret Revell.
  180. Accomac County, Virginia Marriages
  181. Elizabeth M. Revell, widow of George C. appears in Accomack County Personal Property Tax Records 1820-1831.
  182. Register of Deaths, Accomac County 1854-1890. Orders 1851-1854 Page 530, dated 30 Jan 1854 Administration of Estate to Nathaniel F. Revell and John R. Watson with John B. Ailworth and Edmund R. Allen securities.
  183. John B. appears in Accomack County Personal Property Tax Records 1815-1835. In 1824 and thereafter record calls John B. "Captain" which is probably an industry title.
  184. John's middle name "Bagwell" was determined from the LWT of George Poulson dated 3 Jul 1804.
  185. Member of Captain Levin S. Joynes's Company of the Second Regiment from Accomack County Company during the War of 1812. Served as a Lieutenant per VA. Military Records Militia of the War of 1812 Volume I Pay Rolls on Page 316.
  186. Wills and Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1800-1860 Page 440 by Miles and Miles LWT dated 28 May 1835 and proved 27 Jul 1835
  187. Accomac County, Virginia Marriages. Northampton County shows 16 Sep 1816.
  188. Accomac County Land Causes 1728-1825 complied by Stratton Nottingham, Page 140.
  189. LW&T of William B. Seymour in Wills and Administrations of Accomack County, VA 1800-1860 by Miles and Miles Page 482.
  190. Northampton County Marriages 1660-1854.
  191. Wills and Administrations of Accomac County, Virginia 1800-1860 Page 440 by Miles and Miles. Orders 1854-1857 Page 65 Administration of Estate to Josiah N. Bagwell. John E. Wise and Louis L. Snead securities.
  192. Accomac Land Causes 1728-1825 compiled by Stratton Nottingham Page 132 Revell and wife versus Hopkins children suit for partition of land Names the children of Maximilian and Elizabeth Hopkins and that Elizabeth's mother as an Armistead. Also names Anna as wife of John B. Revell.
  193. James appears in Accomack County Personal Property Tax Records 1818-1820.
  194. James K. Revell on 4 Feb 1820 signed a mortgage to Snead & Ker per Orders 1819-1822 Page 3xx
  195. "Coleburn" learned in Catherine Revell Scott's LW&T proved on 27 Jan 1806.
  196. Edward C. Revell on 5 Jun 1820 signed a mortgage to Snead & Ker per Orders 1819-1822 Page 367.
  197. Revolutionary War Records of Soldiers, Accomac County Virginia Page 34. Court held on 30 Apr 1832 page 465 states that Edward C. Revell son of John Revell who served in the Virginia State Navy during the Revolutionary War died intestate and without heirs.
  198. Elizabeth Rebecca Revell, orphan of John came into court and made choice of James Poulson for her guardian, who thereupon gave bond according to the law in the sum of $1,000 with Thomas Joynes as security per Orders 1819-1822 Page 260.
  199. Accomac County, Virginia Marriage Register.
  200. Accomac County, Virginia Marriage Register Page 71.
  201. LW&T of James B. Poulson in Wills and Administrations of Accomack County, VA 1800-1860 by Miles and Miles Page 430. Sarah has already passed on.
  202. Tombstone at Scott Hall Burying Ground Onancock, VA.
  203. Tombstone at Scott Hall Burying Ground Onancock, VA.
  204. Will and Administrations of Accomac County Virginia 1663-1800 compiled by Stratton Nottingham, Page 400. George Corbin names Ker as his son-in-law dated 24 Sept 1793 and probated 29 Oct 1793.
  205. Accomack County Wills children named in Eleanor and Anthony's LWT or Inventory of estate.
  206. Virginia Vital Records, Old Tombstones in Northampton and Accomack Counties, VA Page 538.
  207. Accomack County Wills 1794-1796 names brothers and sisters.
  208. Accomack County Orders 1842-1845 Page 386.
  209. Orders 1829-1832 Page 318 Comfort Anne Revell, deceased vs Edward A. Revell, In Chancery.
  210. St. George’s Parish Baptismal Register Pungoteaque, Virginia page 2 #13 gives baptismal date as 5 Mar 1820.
  211. St. George’s Parish Funeral Register Pungoteaque, Virginia page 1 #20 gives burial date as 6 Mar 1820.
  212. St. George’s Parish Baptismal Register Pungoteaque, Virginia page 4 #7 gives baptismal date as 16 Mar 1823.
  213. Worcester County, MD Marriage Licenses 1795-1865 by Mary Beth & Vanessa Long Page 36.
  214. Death notice appeared in Richmond Enquirer & Whig Obituaries both Virginia newspapers.
  215. Accomac County, Virginia Marriages Page 62. Worcester County, MD Marriage License 21 Mar 1839; Leslie Dryden Collection P-346 at Nabb Research Center gives the date as 21 Mar 1840. .
  216. Accomack County Death Register 1853-1892
  217. Accomac County, Virginia Marriages
  218. Accomack County Death Register 1853-1892
  219. Accomac County, Virginia Marriages Page 64.
  220. Accomac County Marriages 1795-1855 by Norma Turman, Page 233. Levin S. Joynes was security.
  221. Accomac County, Virginia Land Causes 1728-1825 by Stratton Nottingham page 140 Court held on 25 Aug 1823 page 240. Rosey Revell is listed as the child of George and Rosey Seymour. It further states that Rosey Seymour married John B. Revell and that Rosey Seymour Revell is their only child.
  222. St. George’s Parish Baptismal Register Pungoteaque, Virginia page 2 #7 gives baptismal date as 28 May 1820.
  223. Accomac County, Virginia Marriages Page 64.
  224. Accomac Land Causes, suit filed by guardian Robert J. Poulson on 14 Oct 1847 gives her age as 14 years and names her half-sister Rasa S. Revell and her husband Isaiah Bagwell.
  225. Accomac County, Virginia Marriages and Marriage Records of Accomac County, VA 1854-1895 by Miles & Miles Page 330. Elizabeth was a ward of Robert J. Poulson. Elizabeth's age is 21 years and Daniel is 30 years.
  226. Worchester County, MD Marriage Records. Nathaniel Revell 21years of Pocomoke City to Nellie May Wharton 22 years of age from Crisfield, MD. Dryden Collection P-238
  227. Marriage Records of Accomack County, VA 1854-1895 by Miles & Miles Page 292.
  228. Marriage Records of Accomack County, VA 1854-1895 by Miles & Miles Page 345.
  229. Accomack County Death Register 1853-1892.

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